It’s time to talk about what a lack of access to safe abortion means

It’s time to talk about what a lack of access to safe abortion means

Viviana Waisman
18 October 2018

This year, something has changed about the way we talk about abortion. You can feel it on the street, on Twitter, in the media.... Something has changed, and there’s no turning back.

In May, the vote on the Irish referendum to legalize abortion filled me with hope. Thanks to the energy of young Irish people, a major victory was won for women’s rights.

Continued: https://www.opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/viviana-waisman/it-s-time-to-talk-about-what-lack-of-access-to-safe-abortion-means

Read more

When Abortion Is Illegal, Women Rarely Die. But They Still Suffer.

When Abortion Is Illegal, Women Rarely Die. But They Still Suffer.
A look at what happens when abortion is forbidden, from countries where it still is

Olga Khazan
Oct 11, 2018

In August, the Argentine Senate rejected a bill that would have decriminalized abortion in the country within the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. Less than a week later, the newspaper Clairín reported that a 34-year-old woman died from septic shock after attempting to terminate her own pregnancy using parsley.

The woman, referred to only as Elizabeth, became one of the 40-some Argentine women who die each year from unsafe abortions. “Illegality forces the poorest women to use the most desperate practices,” one doctor was quoted as saying.

Continued: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/10/how-many-women-die-illegal-abortions/572638/

Read more

Normalizing Abortion

Normalizing Abortion

Sep 25, 2018
Françoise Girard

On September 28, activists around the world will mark International Safe Abortion Day, a global campaign to repeal laws that deny women the right to reproductive health care. The message is simple: no woman anywhere should have to tolerate restrictions that too often lead to injury or death.

NEW YORK – Last month in Buenos Aires, Elizabeth, a 34-year-old mother of two, died after inserting parsley into her cervix in a desperate attempt to induce an abortion. Days earlier, Argentina’s Senate had narrowly defeated legislation that would have legalized abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. If that bill had passed, Elizabeth might be alive today. Instead, she is a grim statistic: one of more than 40 Argentinian women who will die this year from botched abortions.

Continued: https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/international-safe-abortion-day-legalizing-abortion-services-by-francoise-girard-2018-09

Read more

Argentinians formally leave Catholic church over stance on abortion

Argentinians formally leave Catholic church over stance on abortion
More than 3,700 people submit apostasy requests in protest against anti-abortion campaign

Uki Goñi in Buenos Aires
Sun 9 Sep 2018

Thousands of Argentinians – most of them women – have started formal proceedings to abandon the Catholic church, in protest of the church’s campaign against efforts to legalise abortion in the country.

In the month since the country's senate voted to maintain a ban on almost all abortions, more than 3,700 people have submitted apostasy applications to the Argentinian synod, according to César Rosenstein, a lawyer and founding member of the Argentinian Coalition for a Lay State.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/09/argentina-catholic-church-legalize-abortion-apostacy

Read more

My Body, the Majority’s Choice? A Comparative Overview of Abortion Laws in Ireland and Argentina

My Body, the Majority’s Choice? A Comparative Overview of Abortion Laws in Ireland and Argentina

Helena Guimarães de Oliveira
Mon 3 Sep 2018

Women in Argentina celebrated a landmark achievement in June 2018 that they believed would pave the way for the legalization of abortion on request in the country. A majority of the Chamber of Deputies approved a bill that would permit abortions on request during the first 14 weeks of pregnancy and increase the scope for legal abortions after the 15th week.

However, on August 8th, the bill was rejected by the Senate. This was a great disappointment for Argentinian women – and those all around the world who had supported the movement – and represented an unfortunate backward step, since the current law, enacted in 1921, will be retained and abortion will remain a crime.

Continued: https://verfassungsblog.de/my-body-the-majoritys-choice-a-comparative-overview-of-abortion-laws-in-ireland-and-argentina/

Read more

Undaunted by Senate Loss, Argentine Abortion Advocates Forge New Tactics, Coalitions

Undaunted by Senate Loss, Argentine Abortion Advocates Forge New Tactics, Coalitions
Activists who want church-state separation are staging public withdrawals from the Catholic Church, a new web tool uses emojis to pinpoint legislators' abortion stance, and the fight to change the law may advance the case for sex education.

Aug 28, 2018
Carla McKirdy

On August 9, Argentina’s Senate rejected a bill that would have legalized abortion during the first 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Instead of feeling downtrodden, pro-choice activists are retooling and finding ingenious ways to keep the abortion issue at the forefront. From staging public renunciations of the Catholic Church, deploying social media to hold anti-abortion legislators accountable, and using the debate to advance comprehensive sexual education, they are making lemonade from the defeat.

Continued: https://rewire.news/article/2018/08/28/undaunted-by-senate-loss-argentine-abortion-advocates/

Read more

Latin America’s Rights Riddle

Latin America’s Rights Riddle
Why the region says yes to same-sex marriage and no to abortion.

By Omar G. Encarnación
August 27, 2018

In Latin America, progressive politics present something of a mystery: As LGBT rights have flourished, women’s reproductive rights have floundered. Earlier this month, for example, a bill to legalize abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy was defeated in the Argentine Senate. This is the same body that in 2010 made Argentina the first Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage with identical rights to heterosexual marriage. And since that historic milestone, Argentina has enacted one of the most liberal laws on gender identity to be found anywhere in the world. Its code allows people to change the gender listed on their legal documents without a diagnosis of gender dysphoria or permission from a judge, as is required in most countries. The country has also granted same-sex couples reproductive rights, such as access to in vitro fertilization under the national health plan, and has banned programs that aim to “cure” same-sex attraction.

Continued: https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/08/27/latin-americas-rights-riddle/?wpmm=1&wpisrc=nl_todayworld

Read more

Despite law’s defeat, women fight on for abortion rights in Argentina

Despite law’s defeat, women fight on for abortion rights in Argentina

By Kathleen Durkin
posted on August 26, 2018

Women in Argentina may have lost a vote for the right to abortion on Aug. 9, but they are undaunted. They are not intimidated or afraid. They are angry. They are determined. They are optimistic. With renewed energy, they say they will keep on organizing until they win this fundamental right.

The current struggle is for legalization of elective abortions up to the 14th week of pregnancy; 62 percent of the population supports reform. The lower house of the Argentinian Congress had passed such a law on June 14, in response to the mass movement. However, the more conservative Senate narrowly defeated legalization on Aug. 9 with a 38-31 vote; two senators abstained. The majority of “no” votes were cast by men over the age of 50.

Continued: https://www.workers.org/2018/08/26/despite-laws-defeat-women-fight-on-for-abortion-rights-in-argentina/

Read more

Argentine group says 3,000 Catholics quit church over abortion

Argentine group says 3,000 Catholics quit church over abortion

24 August 2018

BUENOS AIRES (AFP) - Thousands of Argentine Catholics on Friday renounced their membership in the church to protest its opposition to a bill that would have legalized abortion in Pope Francis's homeland, a group said.

A list of signatures from Catholics angered at the church's role was presented to the Argentine Episcopal Conference at its headquarters in Buenos Aires.

Continued: https://www.france24.com/en/20180824-argentine-group-says-3000-catholics-quit-church-over-abortion

Read more

Another Argentine Woman Dies From Clandestine Abortion

Another Argentine Woman Dies From Clandestine Abortion
Romina Fernandez died after having a clandestine abortion in a hospital in a Buenos Aires suburb. Her family says she was left to die because she was poor.

Published 21 August 2018

Another Argentine woman has died because of a botched abortion just as the Senate failed to pass the highly-debated abortion bill.

Romina Fernandez had a clandestine abortion to terminate her pregnancy at the Sanguinetti Hospital in Pilar, Argentina, a suburb of Buenos Aires on August 8, a day before the country’s upper house slimly rejected the bill.

Continued: https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Another-Argentine-Woman-Dies-From-Clandestine-Abortion-20180821-0014.html

Read more