Greece – Gender equality body backs decision to remove anti-abortion posters from metro

Gender equality body backs decision to remove anti-abortion posters from metro

Jan 14, 2019

Greece’s general secretariat for gender equality said on Tuesday it agreed with a decision by the Infrastructure and Transport Minister Kostas Karamanlis to remove anti-abortion posters from metro stations in Athens on Monday.

“Informing the public and public awareness must be based on respect, objectivity and responsibility,” Maria Syrengela said in a statement, adding that women’s legal access to abortion is “unquestionable”.

Continued: http://www.ekathimerini.com/248400/article/ekathimerini/news/gender-equality-body-backs-decision-to-remove-anti-abortion-posters-from-metro


Athens metro advertises anti-abortion campaign

Athens metro advertises anti-abortion campaign

By Sarantis Michalopoulos | EURACTIV network and EURACTIV.com
Jan 13, 2020

An anti-abortion campaign poster displayed in the Athens metro has triggered a strong reaction from the government, which forced the transportation company to immediately remove it.

On Monday (13 January), social media in Greece were flooded with pictures from the subway.

Continued: https://www.euractiv.com/section/health-consumers/news/athens-metro-advertises-anti-abortion-campaign/


How to make abortion rarer

How to make abortion rarer
Bans and restrictions do not work. Superior birth control does
Dec 3rd 2016 | ATHENS AND SEOUL

ABORTION, says Theodora, a Greek civil servant, was “an absolute necessity” when she became pregnant last year. Her husband had lost his job and money was too tight for a third child. The procedure, at a private clinic, was “efficient”; she was in and out in three hours. Hers was a typical experience for a middle-class Athenian woman. It is not uncommon for one to have four or five abortions, says a gynaecologist in Athens. In Greece abortion is seen as an ordinary form of birth control.

Most modern contraceptives, however, are not viewed that way. More than half of married Greek women use none at all. Withdrawal and condoms are the methods of choice for most couples who are trying not to have a baby—even medical students, who should know that these fail about a fifth of couples who rely on them for a year. Greeks commonly believe that the pill and other hormonal contraceptives cause infertility and cancer. They also distrust intrauterine devices (IUDs), possibly because they have been taught that tampons are unhealthy.

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Source: The Economist