UN says Canadian funding for reproductive health agency critical after U.S. cuts

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UN says Canadian funding for reproductive health agency critical after U.S. cuts

Michelle Zilio, OTTAWA
December 6, 2017

The head of the UN reproductive health and rights agency says Canada's financial support has been critical to the agency's work after President Donald Trump cut U.S. funding this year.

Natalia Kanem, executive director of the United Nations Population Fund, says the withdrawal of almost $70-million (U.S.) in American funding will put millions of women's lives at risk in the years to come. Dr. Kanem, who was in Ottawa on Wednesday to launch the agency's annual population report, said the Canadian government's renewal of $15.6-million (Canadian) in funding is "lifesaving" for vulnerable women and girls in some of the poorest regions of the world.

Continued at source: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/un-says-canadian-funding-for-reproductive-health-agency-critical-after-us-cuts/article37230933/

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Indonesia: Delayed Abortion Regulation Denies Abuse Victims’ Rights: Critics

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Delayed Abortion Regulation Denies Abuse Victims' Rights: Critics

Aug 21, 2017

The government’s sluggish effort to provide legal and safe abortion services has largely denied the rights of the people, especially victims of rape, to proper reproductive health services, say women’s rights campaigners. Three years after the Health Ministry’s Decree on Reproductive Health went into force, the much-awaited service remains elusive. The decree is a follow-up to Law No. 36/2009 on Health, which legalizes abortion for rape victims and as a life-saving measure.

Continued at link: Jakarta Post (through Press Reader): https://www.pressreader.com/indonesia/the-jakarta-post/20170821/281539406074102
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2017/08/21/delayed-abortion-regulation-denies-sexual-abuse-victims-rights-critics.html

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Should Women Perform Their Own Abortions?

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Hotlines around the world are providing women with the information they need to safely terminate a pregnancy, even in countries where abortion is illegal.
By Jill Filipovic
Oct 03, 2016, Cosmopolitan

Inna Hudaya was a woman in trouble. Lying in a shoddy hotel room, she squeezed her eyes closed as an old woman performed an abortion on her with no anesthesia and no painkillers. They barely spoke a word after the exchange of money — a lot of money, money Hudaya had borrowed and for which she had sold many of her possessions including her motorbike to repay. This, Hudaya thought to herself, is how I will die.

But what else was she supposed to do? She was 22, pregnant, unmarried, and living in Indonesia, a country where abortion remains illegal in nearly all cases and out-of-wedlock pregnancy is intensely stigmatized. A medical student, Hudaya was just getting a toehold on a life she hoped would keep her out of Tasikmalaya, the conservative city she fled after high school. Having a baby would mean the end of everything: her studies, her relationship with her family, her freedom.

[continued at link]
Source Cosmopolitan Magazine

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