Patient records found at shuttered Indiana abortion clinics

Patient records found at shuttered Indiana abortion clinics

Byrick callahan, associated press
INDIANAPOLIS — Sep 20, 2019

Investigators found thousands of abandoned medical records at three shuttered Indiana abortion clinics that were operated by a late doctor who took home more than 2,200 sets of fetal remains, Indiana's attorney general said Friday.

No fetal remains were found during Thursday's searches of Dr. Ulrich Klopfer's former clinics and other properties in Gary, South Bend and Fort Wayne, Attorney General Curtis Hill said at a news conference. But he said thousands of patient medical records were discovered, though he didn't give an exact number.

Continued: https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/patient-records-found-shuttered-indiana-abortion-clinics-65754669


More than 2,000 foetal remains found at home of former Indiana abortion doctor

More than 2,000 foetal remains found at home of former Indiana abortion doctor
Authorities uncover thousands of preserved remains at the home of Ulrich Klopfer

Associated Press
Sun 15 Sep 2019

More than 2,000 medically preserved foetal remains have been found at the Illinois home of a former Indiana abortion clinic doctor who died last week, authorities have said.

The Will County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release late on Friday that an attorney for Dr Ulrich Klopfer’s family contacted the coroner’s office about possible foetal remains being found at the home in north-east Illinois

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/sep/15/more-than-2000-foetal-remains-found-at-home-of-former-indiana-abortion-doctor


USA – Why draconian anti-abortion laws are likely doomed

Why draconian anti-abortion laws are likely doomed

By Carliss Chatman
Wed May 29, 2019

(CNN)The Supreme Court provided a strong illustration Tuesday of the approach the majority of the court may take when it comes to the abortion issue: avoid making a decision unless it is absolutely necessary.

The court decided 7-2 to uphold an Indiana law specifying requirements for disposing of fetal remains by abortion providers. But it also declined to consider the portion of the law that bars abortion providers from terminating pregnancies because of fetal characteristics, like gender, race or disability. In doing so, the justices are signaling that the recent draconian abortion laws will not succeed in overturning settled law on a woman's right to abortion.

Continued: https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/29/opinions/supreme-court-abortion-fight-chatman/index.html


USA: Catholic Hospital Pressured Women to Bury Their Fetuses—Then Pence Made It Law

Catholic Hospital Pressured Women to Bury Their Fetuses—Then Pence Made It Law

Nov 2, 2017
Amy Littlefield

While many find comfort in fetal burial programs, imposing these practices on everyone who loses or ends a pregnancy can cause profound shame and distress, a Rewire investigation found.

Texas has seen some of the nation’s most regressive abortion restrictions in recent years. This series chronicles the fall-out of those laws, and the litigation that has followed.

Tethered to an IV, naked under her hospital gown, Kate Marshall felt trapped as the chaplain approached her bed. It was 2015, and Marshall was awaiting surgery at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Indiana after losing a much-wanted pregnancy. She had not asked to speak with a chaplain, but the man had nonetheless entered her room and then pressed her to sign a consent form that would allow the Catholic hospital to bury her 11-week fetus in a cemetery plot.

Continued at source: https://rewire.news/article/2017/11/02/catholic-hospital-pressured-women-bury-fetuses-pence-made-law/


US: Jailed for ending a pregnancy: how prosecutors get inventive on abortion

Donald Trump has flirted with punishing women for their abortions. But some already are prosecuted under a variety of laws in what is murky legal territory

by Molly Redden

Tuesday 22 November 2016, The Guardian

In late March, Donald Trump sat down for a town hall-style interview with Chris Matthews. The candidate at the time was still crisscrossing himself on abortion rights – should Planned Parenthood be defunded? Was Roe v Wade settled law? – and Matthews made several attempts to pin him down.

“If you say abortion is a crime or abortion is murder, you have to deal with it under law,” Matthews said. “Should abortion be punished?… Do you believe in punishment for abortion, yes or no, as a principle?”

[continued at link]
Source: The Guardian


U.S.: The dangerous state laws that are punishing pregnant women

In the past 10 years, arrests and forced interventions of pregnant women have skyrocketed.

By Lynn M. Paltrow and Lisa K. Sangoi
Think Progress

On August 31, 2016, Purvi Patel walked out of the Indiana Women’s Prison, after fighting a conviction and 20-year sentence for attempting to have an abortion. By the time she won her appeal, she had already spent over a year in prison.

While the fight for reproductive rights is generally thought of as one about access to abortion and contraception, it is increasingly clear that attacks on reproductive rights also often involve the use of the criminal legal system.

[continued at link]
Source: Think Progress


U.S. woman free after serving jail time for self-induced abortion

In this March 30, 2015 file photo, Purvi Patel is taken into custody at the St. Joseph County Courthouse in South Bend, Ind., after being sentenced to 20 years in prison for feticide and neglect of a dependent. (Robert Franklin/South Bend Tribune via AP, File)

Rick Callahan, The Associated Press

Published Thursday, September 1, 2016 1:29PM EDT

INDIANAPOLIS -- An Indiana woman whose feticide conviction for a self-induced abortion was overturned in July walked out of prison Thursday, a day after a judge resentenced her to less time than she had already served and ordered her immediate release.

Purvi Patel, 35, was with relatives when she left the Indiana Women's Prison in Indianapolis about 10 a.m., said Indiana Department of Correction spokesman Doug Garrison.

Her attorney, Lawrence Marshall, said Patel is "very, very joyful that this day has come," but that she now needs privacy so that she can focus on rebuilding her life.

[continued at link]
Source: CTV News