Latin America’s fight to legalise abortion: the key battlegrounds

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Latin America's fight to legalise abortion: the key battlegrounds
After Argentina rejected a bill to allow abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy, hopes of reform now rest elsewhere

Annie Kelly
Thu 9 Aug 2018

An estimated 6.5 million abortions take place across Latin America each year. Three-quarters of these procedures are unlawful, often performed in unsafe illegal clinics or at home.

Of 33 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, only Cuba, Uruguay and Guyana permit elective abortions. Women also have the right to choose in Mexico City. Elsewhere, however, the right to an abortion is severely restricted, with terminations often permitted in cases of rape, or if the pregnancy will endanger the life of the mother. Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Haiti and Suriname all have a complete ban on abortion.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/aug/09/latin-america-fight-to-legalise-abortion-argentina-brazil-chile-venezuela-uruguay-colombia-el-salvador-peru

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The future of abortion access in the United States

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The future of abortion access in the United States

By Anu Kumar, President and CEO
Thursday, July 19, 2018

Well, now we know—President Trump has nominated Brett Kavanaugh to fill Justice Kennedy’s U.S. Supreme Court seat. When Justice Kennedy announced he’ll retire at the end of July, there was a collective panic attack on the part of thousands of us who work to protect reproductive rights.

Kennedy was seen as a centrist and a critical “swing vote” on the court. In the early 1990s and again in 2016, he voted to preserve Roe v. Wade. What’s burning in my mind and the minds of so many of my colleagues and compatriots is Trump’s vow to ensure the Court has another justice who’s against abortion rights.

Continued: http://www.ipas.org/en/News/2018/July/The-future-of-abortion-access-in-the-United-States.aspx

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We know what it looks like when abortion is illegal. Just look at these countries.

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We know what it looks like when abortion is illegal. Just look at these countries.
Making abortion illegal doesn't mean people stop seeking abortion.

D. Parvaz
Jul 5, 2018

With news of Justice Anthony Kennedy’s imminent retirement from the Supreme Court and the likely appointment of a justice who will vote to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion could soon be illegal in large parts of the country.

Women and gender minorities would no longer have the right to choose when to have a child — that’s a given, no matter how one thinks of it. We already know what that looks like, since it’s a reality in many other countries.

Continued: https://thinkprogress.org/we-know-what-it-looks-like-when-abortion-is-illegal-just-look-at-these-countries-3ed16c7d91fe/

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What Will Happen If Abortion Is Banned In The U.S.? Just Look At These Countries.

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What Will Happen If Abortion Is Banned In The U.S.? Just Look At These Countries.

Andrea González-Ramírez
July 3, 2018

"We use the phrase in Latin America," Paula Avila-Guillen, a human rights expert and director of Latin America Initiatives for the Women’s Equality Center told Refinery29, "'Las ricas abortan, las pobres mueren.' [Rich women have abortions, poor women die.]"

Many anti-abortion advocates believe that outlawing the procedure will stop women from trying to terminate their pregnancies, but research has shown over and over again that this isn't true.

Continued: https://www.refinery29.com/2018/07/203412/abortion-illegal-impact-latin-america-united-states

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EL SALVADOR – Interview with Sara García Gross: « In El Salvador, when a woman falls pregnant, she loses her right to life. »

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EL SALVADOR – Interview with Sara García Gross: « In El Salvador, when a woman falls pregnant, she loses her right to life. »

June 22, 2018
by International Campaign for Women's Right to Safe Abortion

El Salvador is ruled by what began as a leftist party and over the years has passed a series of policies in support of women’s rights. But on the subject of abortion there has always been silence. Although they were the first party to introduce an abortion law reform bill after 20 years in power, they then postponed the debate with the excuse of introducing other priority issues, which shows that fundamentalist pressure on them is strong and influential. Among the fundamentalists, there is not only the Catholic Church but also groups related to Opus Dei, who have organised campaigns to discredit and disparage our work on sexual and reproductive rights.

Pope John Paul II visited El Salvador; he was totally anti-abortion. Streets bear his name. Currently, there is a process of canonisation of Bishop Romero, which had already been declared a saint by the people, so it was not even necessary for the church to recognise him. The fundamentalist movement takes advantage of his popularity to promote anti-abortion messages.

Continued: http://www.safeabortionwomensright.org/el-salvador-interview-with-sara-garcia-gross-in-el-salvador-when-a-woman-falls-pregnant-she-loses-her-right-to-life/

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The big picture: Women around the world are fighting for abortion rights

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The big picture: Women around the world are fighting for abortion rights

Haley Britzky
June 17, 2018

Argentina took a step towards legalizing abortions last week after the lower house of its legislature sent a bill to the Senate that would allow the procedure in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy, the BBC reports.

The big picture: Women in countries around the world are fighting for abortion rights, but the Guttmacher Institute reported that 42% of women of reproductive age worldwide still live in countries where abortion is "highly restricted," meaning it's entirely illegal or only allowed to "save a woman's life or protect her health."

Continued: https://www.axios.com/women-worldwide-abortion-rights-ireland-argentina-el-salvador-2d42e9c7-a985-43e4-abaf-cd396632befa.html

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What Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Means for Latin America

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What Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Means for Latin America
Countries in the Region Should Ease Abortion Restrictions

José Miguel Vivanco
Executive Director, Americas Division @JMVivancoHRW
May 31, 2018

Last week, when 66.4 percent of Irish voters stunned the world by voting to end the country’s ban on abortion, it gave many hope that countries in Latin America and the Caribbean—which have some of the world’s most restrictive abortion laws—would join the global trend towards easing abortion restrictions.

Just last year Chile ended its longstanding total abortion ban, allowing the procedure if the life of the pregnant woman is at risk, if the pregnancy is the result of rape, or if the fetus will not survive outside the womb.

Continued: https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/05/31/what-irelands-abortion-referendum-means-latin-america

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What Happens When Abortion Is Banned?

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What Happens When Abortion Is Banned?

By Michelle Oberman
May 31, 2018

The world of illegal abortion today looks nothing like it did 45 years ago.

When I first visited Chile, in 2008, it was one of only a handful of countries in the world that banned abortion in all cases, without exception. Given that hundreds of women a year died from botched illegal abortions in the United States before Roe v. Wade, which legalized the procedure in 1973, I expected to find hospitals in Chile overflowing with dying women. Instead, I found that abortion drugs have dramatically altered the situation.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/31/opinion/sunday/abortion-banned-latin-america.html

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‘Savita!’: why the Irish abortion vote touched women the world over

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'Savita!': why the Irish abortion vote touched women the world over

Finally, a woman’s death at the hands of an old madness did not mean nothing

Van Badham
Wed 30 May 2018

The photograph from the Irish referendum that brought me undone was of white-haired men in the street holding a yellow banner. It read “Grandfathers for Yes”. It came across my phone as I traversed Melbourne in the 86 tram only a couple of days before the vote, like a lobbed bomb of hope and love, relief and change. I sobbed aloud.

It struck with specific weight because there’d been another photo circulating a week earlier of Irish men the same age in a sadly more familiar scenario. “Vote NO” read their own pink signs, “Support women, protect babies, save lives.” That one had left me not in hot tears but a cold rage.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/30/savita-why-the-irish-abortion-vote-touched-women-the-world-over

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El Salvador: Failure to decriminalize abortion is a terrible blow to human rights

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El Salvador: Failure to decriminalize abortion is a terrible blow to human rights
26 April 2018

The failure to pass a reform to decriminalize abortion during El Salvador’s latest legislative cycle is a sickening step backwards for human rights, said Amnesty International today.

“El Salvador’s lawmakers have blood on their hands after declining to even discuss the reform to decriminalize abortion. This desperately needed bill would have saved the lives of countless women and girls who are needlessly put at risk by the total ban on abortion. The wasted opportunity to end this injustice is a terrible blow to human rights in El Salvador,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas director at Amnesty International.

Continued: https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2018/04/el-salvador-failure-to-decriminalize-abortion-is-a-terrible-blow-to-human-rights/

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