She helped her 15 year old get an abortion. Now she’s facing charges in Northern Ireland

She helped her 15 year old get an abortion. Now she's facing charges in Northern Ireland

By Haley Ott
June 26, 2019

London -- A woman is facing criminal charges in Northern Ireland for getting her 15-year-old daughter abortion pills to end an unwanted pregnancy in 2013. The woman's lawyer says the police were alerted after the daughter, who was in an abusive relationship, told a therapist she had taken the pills. The woman's legal team is challenging the prosecution.

Abortion is against the law in Northern Ireland except when a pregnant woman's health is at risk of permanent harm. There are no exceptions in cases of rape or incest. Women who have illegal abortions can face up to life in prison if caught, and medical professionals are required to report anyone who has had one to the authorities.

Continued: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/abortion-northern-ireland-mother-of-15-year-old-facing-criminal-charges/

Read more

Addressing stigma while moving a national campaign: Spotlight on South Korea

Addressing stigma while moving a national campaign: Spotlight on South Korea

Posted June 18, 2019
by inroads Comms, with Na Young

In this article, inroads member, Na Young, of the The Sexual and Reproductive Rights Forum and the Joint Action for Reproductive Justice in South Korea shares with us in detail what it took to generate a people’s movement to get rid of an anti-abortion law and the stigma-busting that is still ongoing.

1) How has abortion stigma shown up around the law historically in Korea?

Anti-abortion law was first made in Korea during the Japanese occupation. After Independence and the Korean War, the first assembly decided to keep the punishment clauses on abortion made by the Japanese government. According to this law, women who get an abortion can spend up to a year in prison or be fined up to 2 million won (about 1,850 dollars). Doctors, midwives and any healthcare workers who provide abortions can face up to two years in prison.

Continued: http://makeinroads.org/making-inroads/2019/June/addressing-stigma-while-moving-a-national-campaign-spotlight-on-south-korea

Read more

From Phoebe Waller-Bridge To Sharon Horgan, Celebs Are Calling On The Conservative Party Leadership Candidates To Repeal Northern Ireland’s Archaic Abortion Law

From Phoebe Waller-Bridge To Sharon Horgan, Celebs Are Calling On The Conservative Party Leadership Candidates To Repeal Northern Ireland's Archaic Abortion Law

'Be the Prime Minister who shows they trust women. Be the Prime Minister who believes in treating all women equally. Above all be the Prime Minster who will not ignore us...'

BY Grazia
June 17, 2019

Dozens of celebrities, including Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Sharon Horgan, Hayley Atwell and Scarlet Curtis have joined forces with London Irish Abortion Rights Campaign to ask the Conservative Party Leadership candidates - one of whom will become Prime Minister next month - to pledge to hold a vote to repeal the 1861 legislation that criminalises abortion in Northern Ireland in almost all circumstances. It is the only part of the UK where this is the case, and in 2018 the Republic Of Ireland voted to decriminalise abortion in a referendum.

Continued: https://graziadaily.co.uk/life/real-life/phoebe-waller-bridge-northern-ireland-abortion-law/

Read more

A Century Old “Heartbeat Bill” In The Philippines

A Century Old “Heartbeat Bill” In The Philippines

By Featuresdesk (ICG) on June 12, 2019

Earlier this May, the US signed a law called the “Heartbeat Bill” which according to news, seeks to make abortion illegal as soon as the fetus’ heartbeat is detectable. In most cases, this is at the six-week mark of a pregnancy – before many women even know they are pregnant. This law has no exceptions for rape or incest.

Here in the Philippines there are facts on abortion you should know about that are similar to “Heartbeat Bill”.

Continued: http://pageone.ph/a-century-old-heartbeat-bill-in-the-philippines/

Read more

Honduras abortion misery a ‘frightening preview’ of America’s future – study

Honduras abortion misery a 'frightening preview' of America's future – study
Reproductive rights pushback could leave American women facing same life-or-death choices as Hondurans, say researchers

Karen McVeigh
Fri 7 Jun 2019

One woman handcuffed by police after suffering a miscarriage, another forced to bear her rapist’s child. A doctor who risks imprisonment to end pregnancies that threaten the lives of patients. The reality of healthcare in Honduras provides a “frightening preview” of what could happen in America if the pushback on reproductive rights continues, Human Rights Watch has warned.

Researchers from the organisation spoke of the “enormous suffering” of women and girls in Honduras, where there is a total ban on abortion in all circumstances.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/jun/07/honduras-abortion-misery-frightening-preview-of-america-future-study

Read more

Honduras: Abortion Ban’s Dire Consequences

Honduras: Abortion Ban’s Dire Consequences
Arrests, Criminal Charges, Health Issues, Bearing Rapist’s Child

June 6, 2019

(New York) – Honduras’ total ban on abortion in all circumstances puts women and girls in danger and violates their rights, Human Rights Watch said today, releasing a web feature on the topic. Abortion in Honduras is illegal in all circumstances, including rape and incest, when a woman’s life is in danger, and when the fetus will not survive outside the womb.

The web feature, “Life or Death Choices for Women Living Under Honduras’ Abortion Ban,” shares stories of Honduran women confronting the cruel effects of the abortion law. They include a woman forced to bear her rapist’s child; a woman facing jail after having a miscarriage; women who experienced complications from clandestine abortions; a pro-choice pastor who has faced death threats for her activism; a doctor who cannot always act in her patients’ best interests; and women who share information about safe abortion in secret through an anonymous phone line.

Continued: https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/06/06/honduras-abortion-bans-dire-consequences

Read more

Honduras – ‘I Can No Longer Continue to Live Here’

‘I Can No Longer Continue to Live Here’
What’s driving so many Honduran women to the U.S. border? The reality is worse than you’ve heard.

By JILL FILIPOVIC
June 07, 2019

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — In a small town tucked in the hills outside Tegucigalpa, there is a stuffed gray bunny rabbit that knows a little girl’s secrets. “I tell him all my things,” she says. “About how I’m doing, and when I feel sad.” She feels sad a lot lately. “I start thinking about things that I shouldn’t be thinking,” she says.

There are a lot of things she shouldn’t be thinking. She is 12 years old and just weeks away from giving birth to a baby.

Continued: https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2019/06/07/domestic-violence-immigration-asylum-caravan-honduras-central-america-227086

Read more

Manila’s Abortion Ban Is Killing Women

Manila’s Abortion Ban Is Killing Women
Roughly 1,000 women in the Philippines die every year from lack of safe terminations. Others go to jail.

By Nick Aspinwall
May 29, 2019

Several U.S. states including Alabama, Georgia, and Missouri have recently passed draconian abortion laws. In Alabama, the new rules effectively ban abortion unless the life of the mother or the fetus is at risk and make no exceptions for rape or incest. The law has drawn damning comparisons to countries such as Bangladesh and Romania.

BBut the most relevant example may be a country whose religious and political history is closely tied to the United States. In the Philippines, a former U.S. colony, abortion has been banned entirely for over a century. Philippine law mandates prison terms of up to six years for people who have abortions and for anyone who assists in the procedure. Arrests and convictions of women and abortion providers are commonly reported in local media, and United Nations committees repeatedly note that the abortion ban disproportionately harms socioeconomically disadvantaged women and members of other vulnerable groups. In practice, abortion is allowed in cases where the pregnant person’s life is at risk, but no law explicitly states this.

Continued: https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/05/29/manilas-abortion-ban-is-killing-women/

Read more

The cost of morality: how Nigeria’s own anti-abortion stance is killing women at an alarming rate

The cost of morality: how Nigeria’s own anti-abortion stance is killing women at an alarming rate
The passing of Alabama’s anti-abortion bill has caused shock-waves around the world but if we look a little closer to home, we would see that we are dealing with our very own violation of human and women’s rights which has already cost many lives.

Ntianu Obiora
May 23, 2019

The issue surrounding abortion rights in Nigeria is a highly sensitive one. Wrapped in layers of anti-women sentiment, religious ideals and buttressed by lack of adequate healthcare.

Abortion in Nigeria is governed by two laws that differ depending on geographical location

Continued: https://www.pulse.ng/lifestyle/beauty-health/the-cost-of-morality-how-nigerias-own-anti-abortion-stance-is-killing-women-at-an/zvdw1f7

Read more

Ecuador’s Crackdown on Abortion Is Putting Women in Jail

Ecuador’s Crackdown on Abortion Is Putting Women in Jail
For decades, abortion was considered a private matter. Now, a Nation investigation shows, women who terminate—or lose—pregnancies are facing prosecution and prison time.

By Zoë Carpenter
May 7, 2019 (May 20-27 Issue, The Nation)

Last year, a lawyer named Cristina Torres got a cryptic phone call from a young woman. The caller explained that she was contacting Torres on behalf of her mother, Sara (a pseudonym), who was imprisoned in the city of Latacunga, a windy crossroads on the Pan-American Highway, high on the volcanic plateau of central Ecuador. Sara was hoping to secure a form of legal relief that would allow her to serve part of her remaining sentence outside of detention. The woman asked Torres to take on her mother’s case—but as for the crime that Sara had been charged with, the daughter preferred not to speak of it. Just go visit my mother, she pleaded.

So Torres drove to Latacunga and, in the prison’s visiting room, met a tall woman with an upturned nose and honey-colored eyes. As Torres would learn, she’d had a difficult life. As a teenager, Sara said, she was raped by her aunt’s husband and became pregnant.

Continued: https://www.thenation.com/article/ecuador-abortion-miscarriage-prosecution/

Read more