Uganda – Abortion in marriages is rising up

Abortion in marriages is rising up

DAVID MAFABI | PML Daily Senior Staff Writer
March 26, 2020

MBALE – When Ms Sarah Nambozo got married, she had her family life planned out well. This is because she did not want to produce too early, too soon, too often and too late.

Her plan and target was to have three children and remain at her workplace stable by the age of 35. And everything had gone according to the plan by the time she gave birth to her third born in February 2017.

continued: https://www.pmldaily.com/features/2020/03/abortion-in-marriages-is-rising-up.html


What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in Idaho

What It's Like to Get an Abortion in Idaho
The closest clinic was more than 6 hours away, so this woman actually went to another state.

by Claire Lampen
Mar 22 2020

Idaho’s abortion policy hasn’t received much stage time in the national debate about reproductive health, but the conservative-led state has, unsurprisingly, some of the more restrictive laws on the books.

Some measures, like one passed in 2018 requiring the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare to gather information on abortion-related health complications (exceedingly rare, particularly in the first trimester, when most abortions take place), seem to exist solely to stigmatize the procedure; others, like one proposed but not passed in 2019, seek to punish patients and providers by reclassifying termination as murder. Last year, two Republican representatives tried to repeal the segment of state law that guards people who get abortions and the doctors who perform them against criminal prosecution. They weren’t successful, but the motivating sentiment gives you an idea of the political landscape.

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/akwq74/idaho-abortion-laws-what-its-like-to-get-an-abortion-in-idaho


What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in Louisiana

What It's Like to Get an Abortion in Louisiana
"There was a huge table of protesters outside the clinic, trying to hand me flyers and rosaries and yelling at me."

by Claire Lampen
Mar 12 2020

Louisiana is notoriously hostile to reproductive rights, and has now become the first state in the Trump era to escalate a legal battle over abortion restrictions to the Supreme Court. On March 4, opening arguments began in June Medical Services LLC v. Russo, a case about whether requiring doctors who provide abortions to secure admitting privileges at local hospitals constitutes an “undue burden” on access.

Abortion opponents in Louisiana and elsewhere see the case as a challenge to Roe v. Wade at the federal level, and if that precedent were overturned, abortion would be illegal in Louisiana, because it has what's known as a "trigger law" on the books. Even with Roe in place, Louisiana could ban abortion at six weeks, if a federal appeals court upholds a similar bill in Mississippi. (Although in that event, it’s likely that Louisiana’s so-called “heartbeat bill” would face its own legal challenge.)

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/g5xm44/louisiana-abortion-laws-what-its-like-to-get-an-abortion-in-louisiana


My Abortion Before Roe v. Wade

My Abortion Before Roe v. Wade

March 8, 2020
Elizabeth Stone

Roe v. Wade is in peril. New restrictions on abortion exist in a dozen states. Providers are threatened with jail. And this week, the Supreme Court heard yet another attack on abortion rights with the Louisiana case June Medical Services v. Gee. According to the Center for Reproductive Rights, the ruling may leave the state’s 1 million women of reproductive age with only one legal abortion provider. And many other states stand ready to follow suit. This rush into the past has flung me back to a terrifying time in my own life half a century ago, one I never expected women today would have to face.

In late December 1965, I was 19 and in Brooklyn, home from college for the holiday break. I was also pregnant. I knew exactly how pregnant I was because I’d spent Thanksgiving with my boyfriend, Mark, who was in graduate school in Indiana.

Continued: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/03/before-roe-v-wade/607609/


Kenya – Deadly secrets and rise of abortion in marriages

Deadly secrets and rise of abortion in marriages
A significant number of women who procure abortion for the first time are likely to do it again

By KINUTHIA MBURU
Feb 25, 2020

Evelyn Wambui (not her real name) had her career and family life all planned out. She wanted to have three children and a stable career by the age of 36. Everything had gone according to plan by the time she gave birth to her third born in February 2018. She had a good career as a human resource manager at an insurance firm in Nairobi. She was also married with two children aged eight and five years. Six months after the birth of her third born, Evelyn started taking birth control pills. “Pills were my most favourable option at the time. I was not ready to use an intrauterine coil. I had also ruled out the Jadelle levonorgestrel implant because of previous heavy menses and constant spotting,” she says.

Having taken her pills faithfully, Evelyn was shocked when she started to miss her periods last year. It started in August, a year after she started taking the pills. “I was not alarmed at first. I had taken my pills well and there was no way I could have been pregnant,” she says. But she knew something was wrong when she missed her periods for the second month in a row. “I became very anxious. I wanted to take a test, but I was afraid. I decided to wait it out for another month,” she adds.

Continued: https://www.nation.co.ke/health/Deadly-secrets-and-rise-of-abortion-in-marriages/3476990-5467236-1167wgg/index.html


What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in Florida

What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in Florida
Florida already makes minors to tell a parent if they're having an abortion. Now lawmakers want to require the parent to come to the clinic with them. Here's one 17-year-old's story.

by Paige Alexandria
Feb 6, 2020

Republican lawmakers in Florida tried and failed to pass a bill in 2019 that would have banned abortion at six weeks. In fact, in the last six years, lawmakers in the state have made more than 50 attempts to limit abortion access, including a ban on a common second-trimester procedure and imposing a 24-hour waiting period for all abortions.

Another bill proposed recently would change the state’s parental involvement law for minors from requiring notification to mandating parental consent. Over half of U.S. states have parental involvement laws. Currently, a minor’s legal guardian or parent must be notified 48 hours before the abortion. But SB 404 would require a parent or guardian to accompany the young person to the clinic on the day of the abortion and provide a government-issued ID along with notarized, written consent. It isn’t the first time lawmakers have tried to pass a law like this, and it’s already been proven that parental involvement laws delay care—which is exactly the intent.

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/z3b3w9/florida-abortion-laws-how-to-get-an-abortion-in-florida


USA – I’ll Never Be Ashamed of My Abortion

I’ll Never Be Ashamed of My Abortion
I want my daughters to have the same agency over their bodies as I did. I’m worried they won’t.

By Ylonda Gault
Jan. 22, 2020

I am medium-brown-skinned — neither rich dark chocolate nor creamy cafe au lait. I am a B cup and have, for a black girl, a barely there butt. I have flat feet and oily skin. And like so many American women of reproductive age, I’ve had an abortion.

I, and I alone, made the decision to terminate a pregnancy more than a decade ago so that I could be the best mother I could be to the two children I already had.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/22/opinion/roe-v-wade-anniversary.html


Tanzania: It is time to act: Deaths and morbidity from unsafe abortion

It is time to act: Deaths and morbidity from unsafe abortion

Kenneth Simbaya
Dec 30, 2019

Reports have it that, despite family planning being mentioned as one of the most life-saving, empowering, and poverty fighter in families and nation at large; contraceptive prevalence in the country has remained low with statistics showing that only 38 percent of married women are using the services.

According to the Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey 2010, less than one in 10 (nine percent) of sexually active youth who want to avoid pregnancy use modern contraceptives. Worryingly, 22.8 per cent of young women between the ages of 15 and 19 are mothers.

Continued: https://www.ippmedia.com/en/features/it-time-act-deaths-and-morbidity-unsafe-abortion


What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in North Carolina

What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in North Carolina
In recent years, North Carolina has “gone to town on abortion restrictions.” This is one person's story.

by Kimberly Lawson
Dec 5 2019

In recent years, North Carolina has, as one researcher put it, “gone to town on abortion restrictions.” State lawmakers in 2013 famously reworked a bill about motorcycle safety to include several provisions intended to make it harder for abortion clinics to stay open, among other things. Although courts have overturned a number of other state restrictions—including a forced narrated ultrasound law and a previously unenforced 20-week ban—North Carolinians still face several barriers to accessing abortion care.

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/8xwwgb/what-its-like-to-get-an-abortion-in-north-carolina


Ireland – Amy Dunne on her lonely, harrowing abortion fight: ‘I was told I would be done for murder’

Amy Dunne on her lonely, harrowing abortion fight: 'I was told I would be done for murder'
At 17, Dunne was pregnant with a baby who had a fatal abnormality. She was given a pseudonym and became the focus of a landmark Irish legal case – but now she is reclaiming her story

Rory Carroll
Thu 5 Dec 2019

The week Amy Dunne turned 17, she was several months pregnant and made two discoveries – one devastating and the other incomprehensible. A hospital scan showed something badly wrong in her womb. The foetus had anencephaly, a fatal abnormality. Doctors said the baby, a girl, would die soon after birth.

Although she was living in foster care and still a child herself, Dunne had looked forward to becoming a mother and building a new life with her boyfriend. Distraught, she shared the news with her social workers and said she needed to travel to Britain from Ireland for an abortion. That’s when Dunne discovered something badly wrong in her country.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/dec/05/amy-dunne-miss-d-abortion-told-would-be-done-for