Tanzania: It is time to act: Deaths and morbidity from unsafe abortion

It is time to act: Deaths and morbidity from unsafe abortion

Kenneth Simbaya
Dec 30, 2019

Reports have it that, despite family planning being mentioned as one of the most life-saving, empowering, and poverty fighter in families and nation at large; contraceptive prevalence in the country has remained low with statistics showing that only 38 percent of married women are using the services.

According to the Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey 2010, less than one in 10 (nine percent) of sexually active youth who want to avoid pregnancy use modern contraceptives. Worryingly, 22.8 per cent of young women between the ages of 15 and 19 are mothers.

Continued: https://www.ippmedia.com/en/features/it-time-act-deaths-and-morbidity-unsafe-abortion


What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in North Carolina

What It’s Like to Get an Abortion in North Carolina
In recent years, North Carolina has “gone to town on abortion restrictions.” This is one person's story.

by Kimberly Lawson
Dec 5 2019

In recent years, North Carolina has, as one researcher put it, “gone to town on abortion restrictions.” State lawmakers in 2013 famously reworked a bill about motorcycle safety to include several provisions intended to make it harder for abortion clinics to stay open, among other things. Although courts have overturned a number of other state restrictions—including a forced narrated ultrasound law and a previously unenforced 20-week ban—North Carolinians still face several barriers to accessing abortion care.

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/8xwwgb/what-its-like-to-get-an-abortion-in-north-carolina


Ireland – Amy Dunne on her lonely, harrowing abortion fight: ‘I was told I would be done for murder’

Amy Dunne on her lonely, harrowing abortion fight: 'I was told I would be done for murder'
At 17, Dunne was pregnant with a baby who had a fatal abnormality. She was given a pseudonym and became the focus of a landmark Irish legal case – but now she is reclaiming her story

Rory Carroll
Thu 5 Dec 2019

The week Amy Dunne turned 17, she was several months pregnant and made two discoveries – one devastating and the other incomprehensible. A hospital scan showed something badly wrong in her womb. The foetus had anencephaly, a fatal abnormality. Doctors said the baby, a girl, would die soon after birth.

Although she was living in foster care and still a child herself, Dunne had looked forward to becoming a mother and building a new life with her boyfriend. Distraught, she shared the news with her social workers and said she needed to travel to Britain from Ireland for an abortion. That’s when Dunne discovered something badly wrong in her country.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/dec/05/amy-dunne-miss-d-abortion-told-would-be-done-for


USA – What’s It Like to Get an Abortion in Georgia

What’s It Like to Get an Abortion in Georgia

by Kimberly Lawson
Nov 25 2019

Georgia made national headlines in May when Governor Brian Kemp signed into law a bill that would ban abortion after 6 weeks and define fetuses as people. While the law has been blocked as legal challenges proceed against it, the reality is that it's already difficult to get an abortion in the state.

What Georgia state law says about abortion:

People seeking abortions in Georgia face a number of restrictions. Abortions are prohibited after 20 weeks unless the pregnant person's life is in danger, their physical health will be severely compromised, or there's a lethal fetal anomaly.

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/8xwyqg/whats-it-like-to-get-an-abortion-in-georgia


Nigeria – A tragedy of choice!

A tragedy of choice!

On November 23, 2019
by Urowayino Jeremiah

Abortion! I’d almost forgotten that such a word exists until last Thursday. The gist was that a former neighbour’s teenage daughter died last week due to complications from an illegal abortion. No sooner had I walked into my regular salon in the area, did my hair dresser, wearing a forlorn face ask if I had stopped at Mummy Seni’s house. I said no and asked why. “Did something happen to her?

“So you have not heard. Jumoke, Mummy Seni’s daughter is dead oh!!

Continued: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/11/a-tragedy-of-choice/


Indian Women Are Fighting Stigma by Sharing Their Personal Abortion Stories

Indian Women Are Fighting Stigma by Sharing Their Personal Abortion Stories
The My Body My Choice campaign is creating a safe space through which abortion can be discussed and understood openly by women in India.

by Meera Navlakha
20 November 2019

“I had just turned 26, my partner was without a job [and] I was struggling to figure out life,” said one anonymous woman in a post released on Instagram by the My Body My Choice campaign. She explains how she found out she was pregnant, after days of feeling dizzy. “What began after that was an excruciating process of figuring out how, when and where to seek an abortion.”

“My stomach would cramp all of a sudden and I’d feel the deepest sense of loss,” said another woman, describing her abortion story.

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en_in/article/vb5aaj/indian-women-are-fighting-stigma-by-sharing-their-personal-abortion-stories


Tanzania – Stigma a factor in unsafe abortions in Lake Zone

Stigma a factor in unsafe abortions in Lake Zone

by Lusekelo Philemon
Nov 19, 2019

At the time, Epiphania was only in Form Three. Things became more complicated when she thought of how to break the news of the pregnancy, taking into account that her father was a senior and respected church member.

She thought of the community and her colleagues—she was one of the choir members in the church. Worse still, Epiphania was also confused when she came to realize that the man behind the pregnancy was nowhere to be seen.

Continued: https://www.ippmedia.com/en/node/71488


Abortion: What does the change in the law mean for NI women?

Abortion: What does the change in the law mean for NI women?

By Hannah Gay, BBC News NI
Oct 22, 2019

A new chapter has been written in the political and social history of Northern Ireland, centred on one of the most sensitive issues and one which continues to divide opinion.

As the clock passed midnight and Monday became Tuesday, abortion was decriminalised in line with Westminster legislation, which said the law would change unless Northern Ireland's devolved government was restored by 21 October.

Continued: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-50129880


USA – 12 Men Share Their Abortion Stories

12 Men Share Their Abortion Stories

Even as male lawmakers dominate the debate around women’s reproductive health at the highest levels—and a spate of restrictive bans are passed across the country—public conversations about the very real experiences men have had with abortion remain rare. As access is further limited and with a likely Supreme Court decision on the horizon, here, in a special collaboration between Glamour and GQ, 12 men share how the procedure has impacted their life.

By Rebecca Nelson
October 21, 2019

Last May, when the Alabama state senate voted to effectively outlaw all abortions, every one of the 25 lawmakers who voted for the bill was a man. Similarly, in Georgia, male legislators who voted for the fetal heartbeat bill, which banned abortion as early as six weeks into pregnancy, far outnumbered the female yea votes. And in Louisiana, a man wrote the state’s version of a heartbeat bill while the governor, another man, signed it into law.

Continued: https://www.glamour.com/story/men-abortion-stories


‘The doctors in Northern Ireland knew my baby would die. But I was refused an abortion’

‘The doctors in Northern Ireland knew my baby would die. But I was refused an abortion’
One grieving woman tells of the suffering the current ban caused her

Susan McKay
Sun 6 Oct 2019

Denise Phelan was denied an abortion three years ago in circumstances so extreme she still finds it harrowing to speak about it, and does so only because she is determined that no other woman should be forced to go through a similar experience.

“My anger wakes me up at night. It’s a deep, almost in-the-bone anger,” she says. She and her husband, Richard Gosnold, are also still grieving for the loss of their baby, Alenja. Their trauma has been prolonged and they feel it is too late now to try for another pregnancy.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/06/the-doctors-in-northern-ireland-knew-my-baby-would-die-but-i-was-refused-an-abortion