USA – How to Prepare for a World Where Abortion Is Illegal

How to Prepare for a World Where Abortion Is Illegal

By Sady Doyle
Oct 18, 2018

The confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court seems to have ushered in a kind of nuclear winter for the reproductive rights movement. Kavanaugh was selected from a list of “pro-life” justices committed to overturning Roe; thanks to him, abortion access will likely be curtailed even further in all 50 states.

We don’t yet know when or how Roe will fall. Women and trans people have been losing the right to abortion for decades — through the defunding and closure of abortion clinics, through restrictions imposed by the states, or through the Hyde Amendment, a federal ban on abortion funding which effectively prevents low-income women from getting care. Some advocates expect the loss to continue this way, with states being allowed to pass increasingly draconian bans. Others see a grimmer endgame in sight.

Continued: https://www.elle.com/culture/career-politics/a23889097/how-to-prepare-for-a-world-where-abortion-is-illegal/

Read more

Does it Matter if Abortion Is Legal?

Does it Matter if Abortion Is Legal?
A new book warns that even with Roe v. Wade intact, the procedure is still effectively banned in some places.

By Rebecca Grant
November 8, 2017

In 2013, 22-year old Beatriz Garcia found herself in the middle of the global abortion debate, a symbol and a lightning rod for what happens when a woman who lives in a country with a total abortion ban faces a life-threatening pregnancy.
.....
Michelle Oberman, a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, opens her new book Her Body, Our Laws: On the Front Lines of the Abortion Wars, From El Salvador to Oklahoma, with Beatriz’s story. The case gives grounding to this ambitious book, which looks at the effects of abortion restrictions in Latin America and the United States. Oberman has spent her career studying the murky ethical waters of pregnancy and motherhood. She’s done research about pregnant women who abuse drugs and written two books about mothers who have killed their children. Her mission with this book is not to argue whether or not abortion should be legal, but to interrogate the impact of laws that restrict it.

Continued at source: https://newrepublic.com/article/145700/matter-abortion-legal

Read more

Controversial Ruling Threatens Abortion Access in Uruguay and Beyond

Controversial Ruling Threatens Abortion Access in Uruguay and Beyond

Mar 14, 2017
Lauren Rankin

In 2012, Uruguay changed its law to allow abortions up to 12 weeks of pregnancy. But a judge's ruling that a woman could not have an abortion without her ex-partner's consent sets a dangerous and possibly globally influential precedent valuing the fetus and father's wishes over those of the pregnant person.

A recent case in Uruguay has fueled a divisive public conversation about abortion in the country, where legal abortion is still very new.

On February 24, a Uruguayan local family judge ruled that a 24-year-old woman could not terminate her 10-week pregnancy after the woman’s ex-boyfriend tried to stop her from going through with the procedure.

Continued at source: Rewire: https://rewire.news/article/2017/03/14/controversial-ruling-threatens-abortion-access-uruguay-beyond/

Read more

US: Jailed for ending a pregnancy: how prosecutors get inventive on abortion

Donald Trump has flirted with punishing women for their abortions. But some already are prosecuted under a variety of laws in what is murky legal territory

by Molly Redden

Tuesday 22 November 2016, The Guardian

In late March, Donald Trump sat down for a town hall-style interview with Chris Matthews. The candidate at the time was still crisscrossing himself on abortion rights – should Planned Parenthood be defunded? Was Roe v Wade settled law? – and Matthews made several attempts to pin him down.

“If you say abortion is a crime or abortion is murder, you have to deal with it under law,” Matthews said. “Should abortion be punished?… Do you believe in punishment for abortion, yes or no, as a principle?”

[continued at link]
Source: The Guardian

Read more