U.S.: Lessons from before Abortion Was Legal

Lessons from before Abortion Was Legal

Before 1973, abortion in the U.S. was severely restricted. More than 40 years later Roe v. Wade is under attack, and access increasingly depends on a woman's income or zip code

By Rachel Benson Gold, Megan K. Donovan | Scientific American September 2017 Issue
Posted Aug 15, 2017

When she went before the u.s. Supreme Court for the first time in 1971, the 26-year-old Sarah Weddington became the youngest attorney to successfully argue a case before the nine justices—a distinction she still holds today.

Weddington was the attorney for Norma McCorvey, the pseudonymous “Jane Roe” of the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that recognized the constitutional right to abortion—one of the most notable decisions ever handed down by the justices.

Continued at source: Scientific American: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/lessons-from-before-abortion-was-legal/

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Moves to restrict abortion law trigger global concern over reproductive rights

by Ruth Green
International Bar Association
Thursday, 5 January 2017

Towards the end of 2016, thousands of women across Poland demonstrated against the government’s plans to introduce an outright ban on abortions. In a year that saw growing concerns over strict abortion laws in other parts of the world, the move – which would have led to a prison term for both the offending woman and any assisting physician – was greeted with widespread condemnation.

Within days, the proposal was resoundingly rejected by the country’s Parliament. Nevertheless, it raises questions of concern about a country’s willingness to make its laws on abortion even more restrictive.

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Source: International Bar Association

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Protesters gather in Warsaw to oppose further bid to tighten abortion law

Demonstrators rally against new proposal to outlaw abortions in cases where foetus is unviable or suffers abnormalities

Associated Press
Sunday 23 October 2016

Hundreds of protesters dressed in black have taken to the streets of Warsaw for the latest demonstration against efforts by the nation’s conservative leaders to tighten Poland’s already restrictive abortion law.

A large group gathered on Sunday outside the parliament building in Warsaw, chanting: “We have had enough!” Polish media reported similar protests in cities and towns across the country.

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Source: The Guardian

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U.S.: Clinton invokes women’s rights around the world as she defends choice

By Tom Murphy on 20 October 2016, Humanosphere

The contentious issue of abortion came up during the final U.S. presidential debate on Wednesday.

Hillary Clinton affirmed women’s right to abortion while Donald Trump said he would appoint judges to the Supreme Court who oppose it. Clinton countered by looking internationally to the consequences of governments circumventing reproductive rights.

“I’ve had a great honor of traveling across the world on behalf of our country. I’ve been to countries where governments either forced women to have abortions, like they used to do in China, or forced women to bear children, like they used to do in Romania,” Clinton said.

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Source: Humanosphere

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U.S: A State-by-State List of the Lies Abortion Doctors Are Forced to Tell Women

Illustration by Eleanor Doughty

by Callie Beusman
(Additional reporting by Leila Ettachfini)
Aug 18 2016, Broadly

In 26 states, abortion providers are required to carry "informed consent" brochures devised by conservative politicians, who say they're simply trying to help women make a difficult decision. But others say they're forcing doctors to give inaccurate and misleading information to their patients—with the intent of discouraging them from abortion.

When she worked at an abortion clinic in South Dakota, Dr. Diane Horvath-Cosper was legally required to tell prospective patients that there was a chance that abortion would increase their risk of breast cancer and suicide.

Immediately afterwards, she'd tell them that neither of those statements had any actual basis in medical science. "What I would say was, 'The state requires me to give you this information. We have excellent medical evidence to say that it's actually not true, but I'm required to tell you this,'" she recalls.

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Source: Broadly

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