BENIN – Alerte sur les avortements sauvages (Alert on unsafe abortions)

BENIN – Alerte sur les avortements sauvages (Alert on unsafe abortions)

by International Campaign for Women's Right to Safe Abortion
Dec 6, 2018

Despite the restrictions imposed by the law and a socio-cultural context where it remains a taboo subject, abortion is common in Benin where many girls and women practice it in hiding, risking their lives.

Solange, 32, remembers it as if it were yesterday. Pregnant a little over a month while she lives an adventure “without promises” with a man, she does not wish to keep the pregnancy. Already the father of a daughter whom his mother helps him to raise, this man is not ready to take on a second paternity. He cannot afford it, either. Very soon, they come into contact with a young man who puts them in contact with the “doctor” of a private care practice located in Akpakpa, a district of Cotonou. Against 30,000 FCFA, about US$51, the “doctor” helps Solange get rid of the pregnancy. “I do not even know if he was a doctor or not. My only concern at the time was to end this pregnancy,” says Solange today, who has done rather well. “He gave me an injection before “scraping” inside. It did not hurt. We were in a very dimly lit room.”

Continued: http://www.safeabortionwomensright.org/benin-alerte-sur-les-avortements-sauvages-alert-on-unsafe-abortions/

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BOTSWANA – In Botswana it is easier to have a back street abortion than to be treated for flu at Princes Marina Hospital

BOTSWANA – In Botswana it is easier to have a back street abortion than to be treated for flu at Princes Marina Hospital

by International Campaign for Women's Right to Safe Abortion
Dec 6, 2018

For Pula 800 and a click of the mouse, Batswana women who wish to terminate unwanted pregnancies can have their wishes fulfilled in a few hours while influenza patients are still queuing to see a doctor, according to Sunday Standard investigations.

The right of women to terminate a pregnancy in Botswana has been the subject of political, medical, social and legal debate, but 18 years later it remains a criminal offence unless it is permitted under the Penal Code 1991, which permits abortion up to 16 weeks of pregnancy on grounds of rape, defilement or incest; if the pregnancy puts the life of the woman at risk or may cause harm to her physical or mental health; or the fetus would suffer or later develop physical or mental abnormality.

Continued: http://www.safeabortionwomensright.org/botswana-in-botswana-it-is-easier-to-have-a-back-street-abortion-than-to-be-treated-for-flu-at-princes-marina-hospital/

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Dominican Republic: Abortion Ban Endangers Health

Dominican Republic: Abortion Ban Endangers Health
Criminal Penalties Violate Rights

November 19, 2018

(Santo Domingo) – The Dominican Republic’s total ban on abortion threatens women's health and lives and violates their rights, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. Abortion is illegal in the Dominican Republic in all circumstances, even when a pregnancy is life-threatening, unviable, or the result of rape.

The 78-page report, “‘It’s Your Decision, It’s Your Life’: The Total Criminalization of Abortion in the Dominican Republic,” documents that women and girls facing unwanted pregnancies have clandestine abortions, often at great risk to their health and lives. Many experience health complications from unsafe abortions, and some die. Some women and girls face abuse, neglect, or mistreatment by healthcare providers. The ban does not stop abortion but drives it underground and makes it less safe. As a starting place toward meeting the country’s human rights obligations, Congress should decriminalize abortion in three circumstances.

Continued: https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/11/19/dominican-republic-abortion-ban-endangers-health

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Kenya – Revealed: How students mint cash in sneaky abortion trade

Revealed: How students mint cash in sneaky abortion trade

By Vivianne Wandera
Published Sun, November 18th 2018

A cabal of medical and pharmacy university students have formed ‘clubs’ that are offering abortion services to college girls for as little as Sh2,000.

Investigations by the Sunday Standard have unveiled an intricate web by the well connected undergraduates using their hostels and rooms outside campus as observation wards for their clients.

Continued: https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/health/article/2001303080/how-medical-students-aid-with-abortions

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Kenya – How conmen are minting millions in risky abortion procedures

How conmen are minting millions in risky abortion procedures

The Nairobian
By Jeckonia Otieno
Nov 11, 2018

Carol paid Sh10, 000 and was given four pills and instructed to swallow two [Photo: Courtesy]

Carol, 20, almost became a static because of an orgasm. “I had to get rid of the pregnancy. I am still waiting to join college and my parents would have been mad had they known,” Carol revealed.

A friend advised her to visit a private doctor within the Nairobi CBD, where she was charged a consultation fee of Sh3, 000.

Continued: https://www.sde.co.ke/thenairobian/article/2001302295/how-conmen-are-minting-millions-in-risky-abortion-procedures

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Video: Malawi Government Considers Liberalizing Abortion Laws

Malawi Government Considers Liberalizing Abortion Laws

November 09, 2018
Lameck Masina

Malawi's government is considering a proposal to liberalize the country's abortion laws. Currently, abortion is allowed only when a woman's life is in danger, and many pregnant women turn to risky, unsafe procedures to end unwanted pregnancies. However, the draft law faces stiff opposition from religious leaders who say abortion is a sin. Lameck Masina has the story from Blantyre.

Continued: https://www.voanews.com/a/malawi-government-considers-liberalizing-abortion-laws/4651627.html

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How a Change in U.S. Abortion Policy Threatens Lives in Malawi

How a Change in U.S. Abortion Policy Threatens Lives in Malawi

Hannah Evans, Population, Health, and Environment Specialist
Posted on November 9, 2018

“On average, in a day, sometimes we handle about ten women related to abortion cases,” Sylvester Zimba explains to a reporter from Vice News in August of 2017. Zimba is a nurse who specializes in post-abortion care at Kasungu District Hospital, a small clinic in rural Malawi and the sole medical facility for 600,000 people.

Zimba explains that many women come to the clinic claiming they have experienced a spontaneous abortion despite what a later examination usually reveals: informal, induced procedures generally referred to as “back alley abortions” commonly cause life-threatening complications for which professional medical attention is required.

Continued: https://www.populationconnection.org/how-a-change-in-u-s-abortion-policy-threatens-lives-in-malawi/

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Clandestine Abortion in Zimbabwe Contributes to Maternal Medical Complications

Clandestine Abortion in Zimbabwe Contributes to Maternal Medical Complications
Four in 10 Women Who Have an Abortion Experience Complications That Require Treatment

October 25, 2018
News Release

Nearly all abortions in Zimbabwe are clandestine, with many resulting in complications that require medical treatment. However, half of women who experience complications from unsafe abortion in Zimbabwe never receive the care they need. These findings come from a new study conducted by researchers from the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences Clinical Trials Research Centre (UZCHS-CTRC), the Zimbabwe Ministry of Health and Child Care and the U.S.-based Guttmacher Institute. The study, which provides the first comprehensive estimates of the incidence of abortion and postabortion care in Zimbabwe, was conducted in an effort to understand the potential impact of unsafe abortion on maternal injury and death in a country that has among the highest maternal mortality ratios in the world. The findings are based on surveys of all health facilities in the country, as well as experts on abortion and women seeking postabortion care—which includes treatment for complications from unsafe abortion and miscarriage—and were published in the journals PLOS ONE and BMJ Open.

Continued: https://www.guttmacher.org/news-release/2018/clandestine-abortion-zimbabwe-contributes-maternal-medical-complications

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It’s time to talk about what a lack of access to safe abortion means

It’s time to talk about what a lack of access to safe abortion means

Viviana Waisman
18 October 2018

This year, something has changed about the way we talk about abortion. You can feel it on the street, on Twitter, in the media.... Something has changed, and there’s no turning back.

In May, the vote on the Irish referendum to legalize abortion filled me with hope. Thanks to the energy of young Irish people, a major victory was won for women’s rights.

Continued: https://www.opendemocracy.net/democraciaabierta/viviana-waisman/it-s-time-to-talk-about-what-lack-of-access-to-safe-abortion-means

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When Abortion Is Illegal, Women Rarely Die. But They Still Suffer.

When Abortion Is Illegal, Women Rarely Die. But They Still Suffer.
A look at what happens when abortion is forbidden, from countries where it still is

Olga Khazan
Oct 11, 2018

In August, the Argentine Senate rejected a bill that would have decriminalized abortion in the country within the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. Less than a week later, the newspaper Clairín reported that a 34-year-old woman died from septic shock after attempting to terminate her own pregnancy using parsley.

The woman, referred to only as Elizabeth, became one of the 40-some Argentine women who die each year from unsafe abortions. “Illegality forces the poorest women to use the most desperate practices,” one doctor was quoted as saying.

Continued: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/10/how-many-women-die-illegal-abortions/572638/

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