How Abortion Law in New York Will Change, and How It Won’t

How Abortion Law in New York Will Change, and How It Won’t
The Reproductive Health Act will remove barriers for women seeking to get abortions in New York. But some wish it could have gone further.

By Jia Tolentino
January 19, 2019

In the late spring of 2016, Erika Christensen was thirty-one weeks pregnant, and found out that the baby she was carrying would be unable to survive outside the womb. Her doctor told her that he was “incompatible with life.” Christensen and her husband wanted a child desperately—they called him Spartacus, because of how hard he seemed to be fighting—but she decided, immediately, to terminate the pregnancy: if the child was born, he would suffer, and would not live long; she wanted to minimize his suffering to whatever extent she could.

Christensen lived in New York, a state where, since 2014, an estimated twenty-five to twenty-seven per cent of pregnancies end in abortion.

Continued: https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/how-abortion-law-in-new-york-will-change-and-how-it-wont

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USA – When women are denied an abortion, their children fare worse than peers

When women are denied an abortion, their children fare worse than peers

By Diana Greene Foster
December 5, 2018

What will happen if Americans lose the constitutional right to abortion? Not all women who need an abortion would find a way to get one. Many would carry the unwanted pregnancy to term and give birth.

The discourse around abortion tends to focus on women and generally fails to consider how being denied an abortion affects the children a pregnant woman already has and those she may have in the future. The research is clear: Restricting access to abortion doesn’t just harm women — it harms their children as well.

Continued: https://www.statnews.com/2018/12/05/how-abortion-denial-affects-children-well-being/

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The American abortion rate is at an all-time low

The American abortion rate is at an all-time low
We have better birth control to thank.

By Sarah Kliff
Dec 3, 2018

The United States’ abortion rate has fallen dramatically over the past decade, new federal data shows.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that the national abortion rate declined 26 percent between 2006 and 2015, hitting the lowest level that the government has on record.

Continued: https://www.vox.com/2018/12/3/18119528/abortion-rate-decline-2018-birth-control-iud-pill

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USA – When a woman wants an abortion but can’t get it, the children she already has suffer the consequences

When a woman wants an abortion but can't get it, the children she already has suffer the consequences

October 30, 2018
by Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times

When women are denied abortions, it doesn't just affect their lives, it also affects the lives of the kids they already have, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of Pediatrics.

The new work finds that the young children of women who are refused access to an abortion are less likely to hit development milestones on time, and more likely to live in poverty, than the children of women who sought an abortion and got one.

Continued: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-10-woman-abortion-children-consequences.html

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USA: A Heartbreaking New Study Shows What Happens to Women After They Are Denied Abortions

A Heartbreaking New Study Shows What Happens to Women After They Are Denied Abortions
They face serious longterm economic impact.

Olivia Exstrum
Jan. 18, 2018

There are a multitude of reasons why women get abortions. Maybe they already have children and can’t imagine being able to care for another one. They may not have a supportive partner and don’t want to be a single mother. They may be still in high school or simply don’t want a child. But research has shown that the most common reason women seek abortions is financial.

Although the socioeconomic status of women who choose to have abortions has been studied, a new study released Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health examines what happens to women who want abortions but are denied. The conclusion? Women who seek abortions but don’t receive them experience economic hardship in the years following the child’s birth.

Continued: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2018/01/a-heartbreaking-new-study-shows-what-happens-to-women-after-they-are-denied-abortions/

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U.S.: Being denied an abortion could be more traumatic than getting one

Abortions don’t harm women’s mental health, new study says
by Rachel Becker Dec 14, 2016, The Verge

Women who receive abortions experience less short-term anxiety and low self-esteem than women who are denied them, according to a new study. This is consistent with previous findings that the vast majority of women who receive abortions feel relief. And it’s another nail in the coffin of the tired misconception that women who terminate their pregnancies are psychologically damaged by the experience.

In the United States, 35 states require a waiting period and counseling before a woman can terminate her pregnancy. In nine of those states, women are required to receive information about the supposed long-term psychological consequences of getting an abortion, such as post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. But a new study published today in the journal JAMA Psychiatry reveals that those warnings aren’t actually based on scientific evidence.

[continued at link]
Source: The Verge

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U.S.: Abortion Is Found to Have Little Effect on Women’s Mental Health

By PAM BELLUCK, DEC. 14, 2016, New York Times

It’s an idea that has long been used as an argument against abortion — that terminating a pregnancy causes women to experience emotional and psychological trauma.

Some states require women seeking abortions to be counseled that they might develop mental health problems. Now a new study, considered to be the most rigorous to look at the question in the United States, undermines that claim. Researchers followed nearly 1,000 women who sought abortions nationwide for five years and found that those who had the procedure did not experience more depression, anxiety, low self-esteem or dissatisfaction with life than those who were denied it.

[continued at link]
Source: New York Times

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