The murky truth about why women in England can’t have abortions at home

0

The murky truth about why women in England can’t have abortions at home
The law that requires women to take the necessary pills in a clinic is a moral hangup based on anti-abortion hysteria

Zoe Williams
Tue 10 Jul 2018

The medical abortion – “the abortion pill” – sounds easier than it is. It happens in two stages: first, mifepristone, then, 24 to 48 hours later, misoprostol, which within a few hours will terminate the pregnancy. In the 90s, you went home in between, but you had to stay in the clinic for the duration of the second process, which was all a bit Handmaid’s Tale; the quasi-medical environment was very alienating, with its enforced solemnity and curtain-cubicles. There was not enough privacy if you were distressed and not enough chat if you were bored.

So, what came afterwards – women could take the second pill in a clinic, then go home – seemed like an improvement, except for the fact that you could miscarry on the way home. It always seemed necessary to ram home the indignities of this by reminding the world that you might be on public transport, the tacit understanding being that women deserve some peril, some inconvenience, in recognition of their dastardly act – but not on a bus. This was the wrong argument, in my view: it ought to have been possible to say: “I don’t want to be in transit at all, you idiots, I want to take the pill at home and then remain at home.”

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/shortcuts/2018/jul/10/the-murky-truth-about-why-women-in-england-cant-have-abortions-at-home

Read more

USA – ‘Self-induced abortion’ searches on Google reflect a dark reality for many women

0

‘Self-induced abortion’ searches on Google reflect a dark reality for many women

By Katie Kindelan
Jul 9, 2018
The battle over abortion rights may be at a turning point.

President Trump is expected today to announce his pick for the U.S. Supreme Court.

The new justice could potentially tip the court against abortion rights as he or she will replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy, who provided a key vote in 1992 to reaffirm Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court ruling that established a woman's right to abortion.

Continued: https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/News/induced-abortion-searches-google-reflect-dark-reality-women/story?id=56232222

Read more

Wales Legalizes Take-Home Abortion Pills

0

Wales Legalizes Take-Home Abortion Pills
Plus, what they might be like in a post-Roe world

Liz Wolfe | July 6, 2018

Last week, the Welsh government approved take-home abortion pills, meaning most medical, non-surgical abortions can be done at home, without the supervision of a doctor.

Currently, Scotland, Sweden, and France have similar protocols in place, though England lags behind on this front. Given that around three-fourths of the total abortions performed in Wales last year were medical, this recent change could mean easier abortion access for women who live in remote parts of the country.

Continued: https://reason.com/archives/2018/07/06/wales-legalizes-take-home-abortion-pills

Read more

USA – Anthony Kennedy’s retirement puts abortion rights at risk

0

Anthony Kennedy’s retirement puts abortion rights at risk
The departure of Kennedy, long a swing vote on the Supreme Court, is an opening for the anti-abortion movement.

By Dylan Matthews
Jun 27, 2018

Anthony Kennedy, the longest-serving member of the Supreme Court, is retiring.

Within minutes of his announcement, CNN senior legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin tweeted this: “Anthony Kennedy is retiring. Abortion will be illegal in twenty states in 18 months. #SCOTUS.”

Nothing is guaranteed, of course, but Kennedy has, since at least 2005, been the swing vote on many of the Court’s most ideologically charged decisions — including preserving Roe v. Wade.

Continued: https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/6/27/17510896/anthony-kennedys-retirement-puts-abortion-rights-at-risk

Read more

Argentina moves closer to legalising abortion

0

Argentina moves closer to legalising abortion
A bill to liberalise the country’s restrictive law may fail in congress. The next attempt will probably succeed

Jun 9th 2018
BUENOS AIRES

WHEN María Florencia Alcaraz discovered that she was pregnant in 2015 she was unprepared for motherhood. The contraceptives she was taking hadn’t worked. Aged 30, she was employed as a journalist in the justice ministry. With a general election in the offing she worried that she would lose her job under a new government. Unable to end the pregnancy legally in Argentina, she turned to friends for advice. One gave her misoprostol, a stomach-ulcer drug often used to induce abortions. At 13 weeks into her pregnancy she popped the pills alone at home and spent a day in bed. The DIY abortion gave her “a sense of relief and autonomy”, she recalls.

Continued: https://www.economist.com/the-americas/2018/06/09/argentina-moves-closer-to-legalising-abortion

Read more

Inside the secret world of Brazil’s WhatsApp abortions

0

Inside the secret world of Brazil's WhatsApp abortions
06 Jun 2018

In Brazil, where abortion is a crime, a WhatsApp group is offering a secret route for women who want to end a pregnancy. The BBC has investigated how the group works for months.

Reporter Nathalia Passarinho, producer Dina Demrdash, filmed by Ana Terra Athayde.

BBC 100 Women has been investigating the modern face of the "DIY abortion", with global online searches for abortion pills more than doubling over the last decade.

Continued: https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-latin-america-44326055/inside-the-secret-world-of-brazil-s-whatsapp-abortions

Read more

100 Women: The modern face of the ‘DIY abortion’

0

100 Women: The modern face of the 'DIY abortion'

6 June 2018

Global online searches for abortion pills have more than doubled over the last decade, BBC analysis of Google searches shows. The findings also suggest that in countries where abortion laws are more restrictive, there is greater search interest in abortion pills.

By buying pills online and sharing medical advice through WhatsApp groups, women are increasingly turning to technology to sidestep legal barriers to abortion.

Continued: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-44089526

Read more

In solidarity with Repeal the 8th! Referendum in Ireland on May 25th!

0

In solidarity with Repeal the 8th! Referendum in Ireland on May 25th!

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Women Help Women welcomes the announcement of the referendum to repeal the Eighth Amendment in the Irish Constitution. We call on Irish citizens to vote yes on May 25th. Women Help Women proudly supports the right of women in Ireland to have a safe abortion, and hope that a day will come when women in Ireland no longer need to depend on our help to access abortion services.

In 2017, 878 women from the Republic of Ireland received our help, an increase of 190% as compared to 2016. In 2018 the number of women from Ireland seeking our services continues to increase. In the first quarter of 2018, WHW has helped 323 women access a medical abortion, a 90% increase over the same period last year.

Requests for help continue to come from every corner of the country, urban and rural. In 2017, we supported women from every county in Ireland to access our services. The need for abortion in Ireland impacts women and their families throughout the Republic, regardless of country, income or age.

Continued: https://womenhelp.org/en/page/900/in-solidarity-with-repeal-the-8th-referendum-in-ireland-on-may-25th

Read more

Protest against the ‘home abortion’ pill in Scotland is about judging women, not ensuring their safety

0

Protest against the ‘home abortion’ pill in Scotland is about judging women, not ensuring their safety

February 28, 2018
Carrie Purcell

In October 2017, Scotland became the only part of the UK where women are given the choice to take abortion medication at home.

The decision by the Scottish government means women seeking “early abortion” in the first nine weeks of pregnancy can take the second of two necessary medications at home, rather than in an NHS outpatient clinic. Mifepristone and misoprostol have to be taken one to two days apart which, until now, saw women attending the clinic for two separate appointments.

Continued: https://theconversation.com/protest-against-the-home-abortion-pill-in-scotland-is-about-judging-women-not-ensuring-their-safety-91416

Read more

Inside the Top-Secret Abortion Underground

0

Inside the Top-Secret Abortion Underground
Code names, top-secret training, and a movement of women determined to avoid the medical establishment.

Nina Liss-Schultz
Mother Jones, March/April 2018 Issue

On a summer day in 2015, Renata and more than a dozen women, all strangers from different parts of the country, sat in a semicircle on the living-room floor of a house, deep in the rural South. A lean twentysomething with a wide smile and olive skin, Renata was the only nonwhite person in the group. And she felt conspicuous in other ways too—many of the women struck her as kind of “new agey,” and some had been involved in a “crystal energetics” midwifery program. All of them had big red binders full of worksheets and documents related to the topic at hand: how to help women self-induce an abortion. “My initial thought,” she recalls, “is, ‘What the fuck did I get myself into?'”

Renata had come from Arizona to attend the weeklong training. She learned how, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, white male doctors consolidated their professional power in part by sidelining female and often nonwhite midwives and other community healers. She learned which drugs and herbs induce a miscarriage and where to buy the small, plastic, strawlike instrument that is inserted into the uterus and suctions out an unwanted pregnancy. If problems arise, what should one say to avoid scrutiny at the emergency room? In which states is self-induced abortion, and helping women self-induce, a crime?

Continued: https://www.motherjones.com/crime-justice/2018/02/inside-the-top-secret-abortion-underground/

Read more