Janet Benshoof: Human rights lawyer who campaigned for abortion rights in the US and across the world

Janet Benshoof: Human rights lawyer who campaigned for abortion rights in the US and across the world
She proved a formidable foe to anti-abortion activists, never cowing to threats of violence, and her vision for empowering girls and women was steadfastly internationalist in scope

Harrison Smith
Thursday 4 January 2018

Janet Benshoof was an American human rights lawyer who campaigned to expand access to contraceptives and abortions across the world. She led organisations that advocated on behalf of women from the US to Burma and Iraq.

In the American territory of Guam, she was once arrested for protesting against her country’s most restrictive abortion law.

Continued at source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/janet-benshoof-abortion-rights-us-human-rights-lawyer-america-world-pro-life-choice-anti-death-a8141321.html

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USA: Janet Benshoof, lawyer who pursued abortion rights for women, dies at 70

Janet Benshoof, lawyer who pursued abortion rights for women, dies at 70

By Harrison Smith
December 19, 2017

Janet Benshoof, a human rights lawyer who campaigned to expand access to contraceptives and abortion, leading organizations that advocated on behalf of women from the mainland United States to Burma, Iraq and Guam, where she was once arrested for protesting the most restrictive abortion law in America, died Dec. 18 at her home in Manhattan. She was 70.

She was diagnosed in November with uterine serous carcinoma, an endometrial cancer, said her son David Benshoof Klein.

Continued at source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/janet-benshoof-lawyer-who-pursued-abortion-rights-for-women-dies-at-70/2017/12/19/76194422-e4d2-11e7-ab50-621fe0588340_story.html

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Looking at Guam’s abortion laws

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(Photo: PDN file)

A key question for us on Guam is whether our current abortion laws meet the terms and conditions set down by the U.S. Supreme Court in cases such as Roe v. Wade and the recent decision of Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt.

My guess is that they do, but the road to compliance has been bumpy, to say the least.

In 1978, the Guam Legislature enacted a criminal law that regulated abortions. The apparent goal was to bring Guam’s abortion laws into compliance with the Roe v. Wade decision.  Tracking the Supreme Court’s trimester approach to regulating abortions, the law provided that an abortion on Guam could be performed within the first 13 weeks of pregnancy.  Between the 14th and 26th weeks, an abortion was permitted if the unborn child faced a “grave physical or mental defect,” or if the pregnancy resulted from rape or incest. The law also permitted an abortion at any time during the pregnancy if there was substantial risk to the mother’s health.

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Source: Pacific Daily News

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