USA – Men Aren’t Quite Sure How to Be Abortion-Rights Activists

Men Aren’t Quite Sure How to Be Abortion-Rights Activists
Does a movement that proclaims a deep belief in women’s autonomy have a place for male voices?

Ashley Fetters
Jun 10, 2019

On a Wednesday night in late May, 44-year-old Matt Garbett of Atlanta attended a meeting held by NARAL Pro-Choice America, a prominent abortion-rights group, at the urging of a female friend who is active in the local chapter. A few weeks earlier, both Georgia and Alabama had taken measures to restrict access to abortion.

Garbett had always believed that Americans should have the right to get an abortion, and he’d always voted that way—and until that night, he said, he’d thought that was enough. But what Garbett saw at that meeting startled him. In a “completely packed” room, full of what he estimated to be 80 people, only three were men. Garbett didn’t feel out of place, however; instead, he was “absolutely embraced and welcome,” he told me. “I was, oddly, overly thanked [for being there]. The next day, Garbett voiced his bewilderment in a thread on Twitter. “Last night I attended my first @NARALGA meeting,” he began. “My biggest takeaway: Men... we are not showing up.”

Continued: https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2019/06/men-abortion-debate/591259/

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USA – The First Time Women Shouted Their Abortions

The First Time Women Shouted Their Abortions
Fifty years ago, a group of women stood up in a church and talked about ending their pregnancies. The way they did so still shapes how we discuss the topic today.

By Nona Willis Aronowitz
March 23, 2019

You couldn’t just casually threaten suicide — you had to sound like you meant it, the woman onstage recalled. “You have to go and bring a razor, or whatever: ‘If you don’t tell me I’m going to have an abortion right now, I’m going to go out and jump off the Verrazzano Bridge.’”

The woman was speaking in 1969. Legalized abortion nationwide was still four years away; in New York, so-called therapeutic abortions were legal — but only if a doctor judged you mentally unfit to have a child. And so, the woman explained, she ended up seeing two psychiatrists who, to her relief, deemed her suicide threats real enough to be granted the procedure. The crowd clapped and roared at the absurdity of it all, until the woman explained that after her abortion, she was stuck in the maternity ward to recover — right next to crying babies. The crowd wasn’t laughing anymore.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/23/opinion/sunday/abortion-speakout-anniversary.html

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How ‘Shout Your Abortion’ grew from a Seattle hashtag into a book

How ‘Shout Your Abortion’ grew from a Seattle hashtag into a book
Amelia Bonow was recently in Seattle to talk about the book, "Shout Your Abortion."

Originally published December 12, 2018
By Nicole Brodeur, Seattle Times columnist

Amelia Bonow was in a Lyft, headed to Seattle’s Neptune Theatre, when she told the driver what awaited her there: She had co-founded a movement called “Shout Your Abortion,” aimed at humanizing, normalizing and de-stigmatizing the procedure. It had spread from Seattle across the nation, and resulted in a book of personal essays by abortion clients, and providers, that was being launched before a crowd of supporters that night.

The driver had a story of his own, apparently, because at some point during the ride, Bonow posted on Facebook: ” … having my one thousandth conversation with a male Lyft driver who knocked somebody up who had an abortion and hasn’t ever talked about it …”

Continued: https://www.seattletimes.com/life/how-shout-your-abortion-grew-from-a-seattle-hashtag-into-a-book/

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Lift Every Voice – “Shout Your Abortion” Is Changing the Conversation

Lift Every Voice - "Shout Your Abortion” Is Changing the Conversation

by Caroline Reilly
Published on November 1, 2018

In 2015, Amelia Bonow shared her abortion story on her Facebook page.

Roughly a year after having her abortion, Bonow watched as the House of Representatives voted to defund Planned Parenthood, where she had gone to have her procedure. Incensed by a culmination of rising anti-choice animus, she decided to proudly and matter-of-factly announce that she’d had an abortion—and that she regarded this experience with gratitude. A friend, appreciative of her disclosure, asked if she could share it on Twitter.

“WE NEED A HASHTAG #SHOUTYOURABORTION,” she texted.

Continued: https://www.bitchmedia.org/article/shout-your-abortion-book

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Plenty of people are pro-abortion

Plenty of people are pro-abortion
It is a necessary health care procedure that saves lives.

Kathi Valeii
Aug—01—2018

Since Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement announcement in June, the discussion about reproductive rights has intensified. Amid the social media discussions about the Supreme Court, and the importance of choice, and Roe v. Wade, emerged a common narrative in support of abortion that went: “No one is pro-abortion, but...” The conclusion to such a statement usually rounds out with something like, “...but we should all mind our own business and let people make their own choices about their health.” And while the latter part of this argument is a message we can all get behind, the first part is a problem.

While the pro-choice movement has long been conditioned to talk in metered ways about abortion, saying “no one is pro-abortion” is patently inaccurate. Let’s be straight — many, many people are pro-abortion, simply because we don’t view abortion as anything more than necessary health care.

Continued: https://theoutline.com/post/5636/yes-people-are-pro-abortion?zd=2&zi=4ry3i5go

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USA – Let’s Talk About My Abortion (and Yours)

Let’s Talk About My Abortion (and Yours)

By Cindi Leive
Ms. Leive is a former editor in chief of Glamour and Self.
June 30, 2018

Several months ago, I appeared on a morning TV show alongside Cecile Richards, then the president of Planned Parenthood. Our topic had been women’s activism, and we’d both spoken in equal amounts. But when I checked Twitter later, the violent insults were flying only at Ms. Richards, with commenters calling her a “baby butcher” and “this puke bitch” for her support of abortion rights. None took aim at me — and as I read the stream, I felt more cowardly than I can ever remember, as if I were crouched in a foxhole while Ms. Richards took fire for the rest of us.

Why was I letting her take the heat? After all, I’d had an abortion myself.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/30/opinion/sunday/abortion-kennedy-supreme-court.html

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Can We Redesign the Way We Talk About Abortion? Meet the Women Behind 5 Very Powerful Design-led Projects

Can We Redesign the Way We Talk About Abortion? Meet the Women Behind 5 Very Powerful Design-led Projects

“There’s an intellectual resistance to beauty and good design sometimes—a notion that if something is flashy, there is a lack of seriousness behind it. I object to that.”
Words by Madeleine Morley

Published on June 12th, 2017

What does real freedom to choose look like, even (or especially) in the states and countries where legislation is decidedly pro-choice? And how can graphic design help communicate a more accurate narrative? As the anti-choice movement gains traction, the positive effects that abortion has on millions of lives can get lost, so we spoke with the people behind five projects and platforms where graphic design and visual communication is contributing to the portrayal of abortion as a normal medical procedure and basic human right.

Continued at source: Eye on Design: https://eyeondesign.aiga.org/re-designing-the-narratives-of-abortion-how-designers-are-contributing-to-the-pro-choice-effort/

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