Contraceptive Knowledge in the Mid-19th-Century United States

Contraceptive Knowledge in the Mid-19th-Century United States

December 5, 2019

Circulating Now welcomes guest blogger Donna J. Drucker, MLS, PhD, Senior Advisor, English as the Language of Instruction at Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany. Here, Dr. Drucker explores the changing availability of knowledge about contraception.

What do pennyroyal, fish skins, horse riding, and ergot of rye have in common? They are all contraceptive methods that have been used for centuries. In preliterate societies, information on regulating pregnancy was likely passed down orally from one generation of women to the next as they helped each other with pregnancies, births, and child spacing. In the mid-nineteenth-century US, however, more and more women were literate and information was more securely captured in print. Examining three mid-nineteenth century medical guides, available online and searchable in the NLM Digital Collections, shows the range of information available to those who could access and read books.

Continued: https://circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov/2019/12/05/contraceptive-knowledge-in-the-mid-19th-century-united-states/


Nigeria – Sexual Reproductive Health: Role of Media

Sexual Reproductive Health: Role of Media

IJEOMA UMEH
Dec 2, 2019

The critical role of journalists in bringing Sexual Reproductive Health matters to public attention, making government accountable and promoting good outcomes formed crux of discourse during a two day workshop for media executives on Sexual Reproductive Health Reporting organized by Marie Stopes International Organization Nigeria (MSION) on November 14 to 16 in Ibadan, the Oyo State Capital.

The workshop brought to the front burner the grey issues of unmet need, low use of contraceptives and its contribution to maternal mortality in Nigeria and other developing countries.

Continued: https://nigerianobservernews.com/2019/12/sexual-reproductive-health-role-of-media/


Calls for emergency contraception to be available without a pharmacist consultation

Calls for emergency contraception to be available without a pharmacist consultation

The Pharmaceutical Journal
2 DEC 2019

A report from the the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists says there is no evidence that emergency hormonal contraception has been misused or overused.

Emergency contraception (EC) should be available over the counter without the need for a consultation with a pharmacist, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) has said.

Continued: https://www.pharmaceutical-journal.com/news-and-analysis/news/calls-for-emergency-contraception-to-be-available-without-a-pharmacist-consultation/20207415.article?firstPass=false


UK – RCOG launches “Better for Women” report

RCOG launches “Better for Women” report
UK women facing widespread barriers to essential healthcare services

RCOG News,
29 November 2019

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) is calling for better joined up services, as part of its “Better for Women” report, published today. It emphasises the need for national strategies to meet the needs of girls and women across their life course – from adolescence, to the middle years and later life.

There should also be greater focus on moving the UK away from providing a disease intervention service towards a preventative health service, says the report.

Continued; https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/news/rcog-launches-better-for-women-report/


Nigeria – How barriers to family planning trigger rise in maternal mortality

How barriers to family planning trigger rise in maternal mortality

By Adaku Onyenucheya
28 November 2019

Experts have emphasised on the need for Nigerians to embrace family planning fully as part of measures to curb maternal and infant mortality in the country.

They lamented that despite the drop in the fertility rate from 5.5 percent in 2013 to 5.3 percent in 2018, according to the Nigeria Demographic Health Survey (NDHS), with a two-percent increase in the total contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) from 15 percent to 17 percent, the acceptance rate of family planning in some communities still remain low due to several barriers such as religion, culture and fear of the unknown among others. The implications, they said, remain multiple pregnancies and births, population explosion that puts pressure of the nation resources, as well as unsafe abortions, which increases the risk of maternal and infant mortality in Nigeria.

Continued; https://guardian.ng/features/health/how-barriers-to-family-planning-trigger-rise-in-maternal-mortality/


India – A pregnant silence on reproductive rights of women

A pregnant silence on reproductive rights of women
The country needs to recognise the wrongs and affirm the rights for advancing women’s sexual and reproductive health

Monday, 25 November 2019
Prabhleen Tuteja

Young women (15-24 years) constitute 11 per cent of India’s population, out of whom 41 per cent have faced sexual violence, 27 per cent are married before the legal age and 7.8 per cent (15-19 years) become mothers or are pregnant. The data on access to information on contraceptives reveals that only 17.7 per cent were informed about family planning by health workers and just 6.9 per cent women in Bihar and 11.6 per cent in Uttar Pradesh (UP) reported using contraceptives within marriage.

The policy level commitments on health, education and gender parity often look in absolute terms of changing certain societal norms through cash transfer based schemes, number of girls reported to be married before the legal age of marriage, status of body mass index and nutrition and sometimes enrollment in school and skill development among women. While evidence in these parameters are significant, this skewed approach to gender equality leaves out a range of issues, including prevalence of sexual violence and status of accessible sexual and reproductive health services. Stigma and fear attached to young women’s sexuality act as a major barrier in achieving gender equality.

Continued: https://www.dailypioneer.com/2019/columnists/a-pregnant-silence-on-reproductive-rights-of-women.html


Coca-Cola and quacks

Coca-Cola and quacks
How Kenya's restrictive abortion laws are fuelling infanticide

Kenya is in the grip of an infanticide crisis – driven by poverty, unwanted pregnancies and muddled abortions laws. Adrian Blomfield discovers the deadly consequences of restricting reproductive rights. Pictures by Simon Townsley

November 25, 2019

On the streets of Nairobi, out of official earshot, nurses say there are different ways of killing unwanted babies.

Some young mothers feed them Coca-Cola instead of breast milk to make their organs collapse. Ginger beer is said to work just as well. Hundreds, perhaps thousands of others, are left to die in pit-latrines, rivers and rubbish dumps.

Or there is always the option of getting someone else to do the deed. Quacks on the back streets of urban slums are often only too willing to end a late-term pregnancy by inducing a living infant and then finishing it off with a blow to the head.

Continued: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/infanticide-in-kenya/


Kenya – Why doctors should tell teens about contraceptives

Why doctors should tell teens about contraceptives

Njeri Mbugua
Nov 23, 2019

Failure by health care personnel to discuss contraception with young people who are just about to start engaging in sexual activity potentially increases unwanted pregnancies and abortions.

This is according to a report on young voices about future scenarios and contraception released in Nairobi on Tuesday.

Continued: https://www.the-star.co.ke/sasa/lifestyle/2019-11-23-why-doctors-should-tell-teens-about-contraceptives/


Report: International Conference on Population & Development+25

International Conference on Population & Development+25
Nairobi, Kenya, 12-13-14 November 2019

Press Release: 22 November 2019

What was it about: some history

This conference has taken place every five years, beginning in 1994. At each follow-up meeting, the overarching purpose has been to measure progress (and the lack of progress) in implementing the 1994 Programme of Action, which was agreed by acclamation by the representatives of 179 countries, and the follow-up actions added at subsequent conferences. An excellent summary of the aims, goals and history of the conference can be found here and a 20th anniversary edition of the Programme of Action can be found here along with a global report on progress published in 2014.

In 1994, UNFPA, the conference convenor, described the Programme of Action as: “a bold new vision about the relationships between population, development and individual well-being… remarkable in its recognition that [sexual and] reproductive health and reproductive rights, as well as women's empowerment and gender equality, are cornerstones of population and development programmes. The Consensus is rooted in principles of human rights and respect for national sovereignty and various religious and cultural backgrounds.

Continued: https://mailchi.mp/safeabortionwomensright/press-release-international-conference-population-development-25?e=372dd34034


‘Church greatest opposition to family planning in Nigeria’

‘Church greatest opposition to family planning in Nigeria’

On November 22, 2019
By Vincent Ujumadu

ANAMBRA State coordinator of family planning, Mrs Stella Ekweozor has accused the church of posing the greatest challenge towards achieving the goals of family planning in the country.

In an interview with Saturday Vanguard in Awka, Ekweozor said the resultant effect is that many women embark on unsafe abortion at the risk of their lives.

Continued: https://www.vanguardngr.com/2019/11/church-greatest-opposition-to-family-planning-in-nigeria/