U.S.: Lessons from before Abortion Was Legal Before 1973, abortion in the U.S. was severely restricted. More than 40 years later Roe v. Wade is under attack, and access increasingly depends on a woman’s income or zip code By Rachel Benson Gold, Megan K. Donovan | Scientific American September 2017 Issue Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Email Print Share via Google+ Stumble Upon Abortion-rights supporters and opponents stage rallies in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 20, 2016. Credit: Mark Wilson Getty Images When she went before the u.s. Supreme Court for the first time in 1971, the 26-year-old Sarah Weddington became the youngest attorney to successfully argue a case before the nine justices—a distinction she still holds today. Weddington was the attorney for Norma McCorvey, the pseudonymous “Jane Roe” of the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that recognized the constitutional right to abortion—one of the most notable decisions ever handed down by the justices.

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Lessons from before Abortion Was Legal

Before 1973, abortion in the U.S. was severely restricted. More than 40 years later Roe v. Wade is under attack, and access increasingly depends on a woman's income or zip code

By Rachel Benson Gold, Megan K. Donovan | Scientific American September 2017 Issue
Posted Aug 15, 2017

When she went before the u.s. Supreme Court for the first time in 1971, the 26-year-old Sarah Weddington became the youngest attorney to successfully argue a case before the nine justices—a distinction she still holds today.

Weddington was the attorney for Norma McCorvey, the pseudonymous “Jane Roe” of the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that recognized the constitutional right to abortion—one of the most notable decisions ever handed down by the justices.

Continued at source: Scientific American: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/lessons-from-before-abortion-was-legal/

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Isle of Man: Statement from Campaign for Abortion Law Modernisation (CALM)

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Statement from Campaign for Abortion Law Modernisation (CALM)
August 7, 2017, by LC

The Campaign for Abortion Law Modernisation (CALM) is delighted that Dr Alex Allinson MHK's draft Abortion Reform Bill was published today, and that the public consultation is now underway.

Throughout our campaign we have emphasised the need for abortions to be available on the Island, particularly in the earliest stages of pregnancy, to avoid woman having to travel across at their own expense resulting in later, more invasive and more expensive procedures.

CALM is also pleased that the need for counselling has been given special mention in the draft legislation.

Our key message now is: reply to this consultation with your views.

"We know CALM's pro-choice message has been heard loud and clear across the Isle of Man," says CALM's Samantha Morris, "and now is your chance to have your say. Please read the draft Bill and respond to the consultation. It's not very long and it's not very complicated, but it really will help to form a unique piece of legislation written to meet the needs of the Island's women. If you don't respond, then you don't have a voice."

The draft Abortion Reform Bill and consultation can be found at: https://consult.gov.im/office-of-the-clerk-of-tynwald/abortion-reform-bill-2017/

Source: Manx.net: https://www.manx.net/isle-of-man-news/83681/statement-from-campaign-for-abortion-law-modernisation-calm-

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Nicaragua: Abortion Ban Threatens Health and Lives

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Nicaragua: Abortion Ban Threatens Health and Lives
Publisher: Human Rights Watch
Publication Date: 31 July 2017

Nicaragua's total ban on abortion is putting women and girls' health and lives at risk, Human Rights Watch said today. The country's 2006 law punishing abortion - without any exceptions, even if pregnancies are life-threatening or resulted from rape - has driven abortions underground. The ban has not stopped abortion, but has made it more unsafe.

Women and girls with crisis pregnancies are getting unsafe clandestine abortions. Often too afraid to seek medical care when complications arise from such abortions, some women and girls delay seeking care and do not disclose to doctors the cause of complications. Medical providers, caught in a conflict between the law and medical ethics, have reported women and girls to police for suspected abortions. Under Nicaragua's criminal code, women and girls who terminate pregnancies face sentences of

Continued at source: Ref World: http://www.refworld.org/docid/597f3e094.html

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Ireland: Anti-abortion groups to display graphic images at protests

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Anti-abortion groups to display graphic images at protests
Displays due to take place on Dame Street in Dublin, and Belfast and Manchester airports

Sat, Jul 29, 2017
Paul Cullen

Anti-abortion groups plan to display graphic images of aborted babies at events in Dublin, Belfast and Manchester today.

Three groups say they are organising “public education displays” in response to the recent decision of the British government to pay for abortions for Northern Irish women travelling to England.

Continued at source: Irish Times: https://www.irishtimes.com/news/health/anti-abortion-groups-to-display-graphic-images-at-protests-1.3171304

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A U.S. Nonprofit Is Funding the Fight to Imprison Women for Abortions in El Salvador

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A U.S. Nonprofit Is Funding the Fight to Imprison Women for Abortions in El Salvador

By Christina Cauterucci
July 27, 2017

A U.S. anti-abortion nonprofit is funding the fight against legal abortion in El Salvador, funneling between tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars to an organization that supports the Central American country’s punishing laws. Reproductive-rights activists are currently rallying behind a bill that would allow for abortions in cases of rape, nonviable fetuses, and life-threatening health complications. Since 1998, abortions have been prohibited by law under all circumstances in the country—by most accounts, the world’s strictest abortion ban.

Continued at source: Slate: http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2017/07/27/u_s_nonprofit_funds_fight_to_imprison_women_for_abortions_in_el_salvador.html

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Philippines: Duterte told: Therapeutic abortion allowed to save women’s lives

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Duterte told: Therapeutic abortion allowed to save women’s lives

By: Tonette Orejas
Inquirer Central Luzon
July 26, 2017

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO — Therapeutic abortion, or the medical procedure that terminates pregnancy to be able to save the life of a woman, is allowed in the Philippines, according to a women’s health group.

The group made the statement in reaction to the anti-abortion posture President Duterte expressed in his State of the Nation Address on Monday.

“In Philippine jurisprudence, it is recognized that therapeutic abortion is allowed to save the life of the woman,” lawyer Clara Rita Padilla, EnGendeRights executive director, said.

Continued at source: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/917566/duterte-told-therapeutic-abortion-allowed-to-save-womens-lives

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Chile – Abortion on three grounds: lack of preparedness and ineffectiveness of the State in the handling of women’s rights

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Chile – Abortion on three grounds: lack of preparedness and ineffectiveness of the State in the handling of women's rights

July 21, 2017, International Campaign for Women's Right to Safe Abortion

As we reported in Campaign news on Wednesday, 18 July, repeated in our newsletter earlier today, on Tuesday night the last Committee in the Chilean congress passed the abortion bill with all three grounds for abortion intact. On Wednesday, it was passed in the Senate. Then, yesterday, Thursday 20 July, it went back to the full Chamber of Deputies, which had passed it a year ago. It was also expected to pass there. However, when the vote finally came last night, the bill fell by one vote because one member of the ruling coalition, which supports the bill, unexpectedly abstained, and several others were absent.

In response, Miles Chile and thousands of supporters of the bill gathered in the Plaza Italia, on the steps of the congress building, to protest. In a news report published today, 21 June, Miles Chile held the legislative and executive powers responsible and described the fiasco as an "embarrassing blunder that exposes the ineffectiveness of the political class".

Claudia Dides, Director of Miles Chile, said: "Everyone knows that some deputies and senators will always be absent for any vote, but this could and should have been taken into account by the ruling coalition and this outcome prevented. It is well known, they said, that when it comes to dealing with a draft law, its passage should never be taken for granted until it actually becomes law. This negligence on the part of the government is insulting to the human rights of women."

She added: "The opposition, who steadily torpedoed this draft law, were violating basic human rights and even plan an appeal to the Constitutional Court against the bill if it becomes law, for it to be declared unconstitutional. This persistent rejection by sectors of the population who obey only their own religious beliefs, instead of supporting a secular State, will go down in history in the same way as those who denied women the right to vote."

The protest was "against a National Congress that denies the most basic human rights of women and against an Executive that, in spite of knowing full well the difficulties and obstacles over many years in all the attempts to pass this into law, were just not up to the job at the final moment".

It is not over yet, however. Claudia Dides concluded by announcing: "We will be watching what happens next very closely, as the legislature negotiates a conclusion regarding this bill, and in particular we will be watching what happens in the Constitutional Court, because we do not rule out appealing to that Court ourselves."

SOURCE: Miles Chile, translated from the Spanish, 21 July 2017 (http://mileschile.cl/?p=4778)

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Abortion in Kosovo, an almost impossible mission

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L’avortement au Kosovo, une mission quasi impossible
(Abortion in Kosovo, an almost impossible mission)
by International Campaign for Women's Right to Safe Abortion
July 18, 2017

In Kosovo, the law allows women to have abortions up to the 10th week of pregnancy, and abortion remains a difficult journey. But some are ready to take all the risks.

“Attitudes do not change. In Kosovo, an abortion is always seen as very bad.”These words of Iliriana Gashi, director of Women for Women Kosovo, leave no doubt as to the image of abortion in Kosovo. Still taboo, abortion is rejected by the public authorities and the majority religions of the country – Islam and Christianity.

Yet abortion has always been legal in Kosovo. Before 1999, it was legal under Serbian law. In April 2006, more or less the same grounds for legal abortion were enshrined in the new laws of Kosovo, then under United Nations administration.

The law says that a woman over 18 years of age and pregnant less than ten weeks may have an abortion. This is two weeks less than in France, where one can have an abortion up to the 12th week of pregnancy (or 14 weeks of amenorrhoea). After this, abortion can only be considered in “cases of danger to the woman and/or the fetus”. A minor must get the authorization of her parents.

But the reality is even worse. Of the 122 gynaecological clinics in Kosovo, only five are permitted by the Ministry of Health to provide abortions, according to a report by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) published at the end of 2006. And only one of those clinics is a public clinic, that is, where the services are free. That is the University Clinical Center of Kosovo, in Pristina. But even there, posters against abortion can be found on the walls, as reported by Le Courrier des Balkans et Prishtina Insight in 2016. The posters say: “Abortion is a crime committed by the mother. ”

Even so, according to UNFPA estimates, there are between 28 and 50 abortions for every 100 live births in Kosovo. In France, there are 26.4 abortions per 100 live births. Many women have abortions because they live in poverty, but this is not the only reason. “They do not want to have many children, because they wish to give their children more education they themselves have received,” Iliriana Gashi told Kosovox.

For those that exceed the legal limit, one solution remains: the backstreets. Private clinics, not licensed by the Ministry of Health, illegally providing abortions. Here, the operation costs between 20 and 50 €, according to the President of Women for Women Kosovo. A large sum of money, since the average salary in Kosovo is 300€ per month. The conditions are precarious and women are likely to suffer complications: infections, bleeding, problems during subsequent pregnancies… even death in the most extreme cases.

Another solution, that costs less, also exists. Pills of misoprostol, available on sale in pharmacies, called Cytotec. But the public authorities are not interested in this problem.

“Our leaders are conservative for the most part,” explains Iliriana Gashi. The subject of abortion and, more generally, of the rights of women, is an uncomfortable one. This is also the view of Dejona Mihali, from the opposition party Vetevendosjë (Self-Determination). “In Kosovo, in the face of fear of blame by the family and society, abortions are most of the time conducted in secret in private clinics where the Ministry of Health has no entry. “In Kosovo, a woman’s right to decide freely about her body is still far from being respected.”

SOURCE: Kosovo Vox, by Manon Gayet, 1 Juillet 2017 (Translated from the French) ; PHOTO


Source: International Campaign for Women's Right to Safe Abortion: http://www.safeabortionwomensright.org/lavortement-au-kosovo-une-mission-quasi-impossible/

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‘Poverty favours the mosquito’: experts warn Zika virus could return to Brazil

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'Poverty favours the mosquito': experts warn Zika virus could return to Brazil

Two months after government says Zika emergency at an end, water shortages and weak health system trigger fears of fresh outbreak

Dom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro
Friday 14 July 2017

Weaknesses in the public health system risk another Zika epidemic in Brazil, according to a report published two months after the government declared the mosquito-borne virus was no longer an emergency.

Blamed for the birth defect microcephaly, Zika exposed human rights deficiencies in areas such as sanitation, access to clean water, poverty and sexual health restrictions, the report released on Thursday by Human Rights Watch said.

Continued at source: The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2017/jul/14/poverty-favours-the-mosquito-experts-warn-zika-virus-could-return-to-brazil

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El Salvador: The people fighting the world’s harshest abortion law

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The people fighting the world's harshest abortion law

By Rossalyn Warren, for CNN
Mon July 10, 2017

El Salvador's ban on abortion is one of the toughest in the world, but for the first time in 20 years, there are signs the law could be weakened. These are some of the men and women spearheading the country's movement for women's rights.

San Salvador, El Salvador (CNN) -- María Teresa Rivera was 28 when her mother-in-law found her bleeding heavily on the bathroom floor. She rushed Rivera to the hospital, desperate to save her life, but when they arrived, medics took one look at the young woman and called the police.

Continued at source: CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/10/americas/el-salvador-abortion-law/index.html

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