India – 16 Days Of Activism Against GBV: How Language & Media Shape Narratives Around Abortion, Contraception & Pregnancy

By Rangeen Khidki
December 6, 2021

In India and its patriarchal society, where power is usually vested in the hands of cis gender-heterosexual men, The languages are also shaped by the same patriarchal structure. The languages, which we usually use, stigmatise and perpetuate gender discrimination, bodily autonomy, and the choice and rights of marginalised genders. It is, therefore, important to look at how languages, which form an integral part of our socialisation process, are being shaped and reshaped by agents of socialisation and by those in power and control of resources and how these languages and media shape narratives around abortion.

The Brahmanical patriarchal structure in India controls every aspect of a woman’s life, putting the control of sexuality of women at the centre. One of the reasons why it is done is for the continuation of the male lineage. Therefore, when a woman gets pregnant, in a cis gender-heterosexual marriage bond, it is glorified.

Continued:   https://feminisminindia.com/2021/12/06/16-days-of-activism-abortion-language-media/


USA – ‘Historical accident’: how abortion came to focus white, evangelical anger

A short history of the Roe decision’s emergence as a signature cause for the right

Jessica Glenza
Sun 5 Dec 2021

Public opinion on abortion in the US has changed little since 1973, when the supreme court in effect legalized the procedure nationally in its ruling on the case Roe v Wade. According to Gallup, which has the longest-running poll on the issue, about four in five Americans believe abortion should be legal, at least in some circumstances.

Yet the politics of abortion have opened deep divisions in the last five decades, which have only grown more profound in recent years of polarization. In 2021, state legislators have passed dozens of restrictions to abortion access, making it the most hostile year to abortion rights on record.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/dec/05/abortion-opposition-focus-white-evangelical-anger


In a case at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, European groups supported criminalising women who had obstetric emergencies

Diana Cariboni and Tatev Hovhannisyan
3 December 2021

European right-wing groups backed the El Salvador government over the imprisonment and death of a woman for having a miscarriage. But they lost.

One of the groups was the European Centre for Law and Justice (ECLJ), a branch of the ultra-conservative American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), led by Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, Jay Sekulow.

Continued: https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/5050/europe-us-right-groups-elsalvador-criminalising-abortion/


The Mississippi Abortion Case and the Fragile Legitimacy of the Supreme Court

Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization is an open challenge to the Court’s authority, and perhaps broadly reflects a spirit of legal self-help that is running through the land.

By Jeannie Suk Gersen
December 4, 2021

The legal landscape of the past weeks and months has prompted questions of which people and entities are legitimate interpreters and enforcers of the law and what happens when you take the law into your own hands. Mississippi and other states took the recent changes in personnel on the Supreme Court as an invitation to defy the Court’s constitutional rulings on abortion, and those states now seem likely to prevail.

During oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, last Wednesday, the three liberal Justices often seemed to be delivering dirges, as though they had accepted a loss and were speaking for posterity. Mississippi’s ban on abortions after fifteen weeks of pregnancy, which boldly flouts the Court’s precedents setting the line at around twenty-four weeks, is likely to be upheld by the conservative Justices.

Continued: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/12/13/the-mississippi-abortion-case-and-the-fragile-legitimacy-of-the-supreme-court


Conservatives Are Tearing Down Roe. That’s Extreme — and Just the Beginning

What makes you think a movement this extreme would stop at erasing a woman’s right to choose?

By ALEX MORRIS , Rolling Stone
December 4, 2021

Listening to the oral arguments this week in
Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, one thing seemed abundantly
clear: Roe v. Wade will soon be overturned. This was clear in Chief Justice
John Roberts’ line of questioning, as he lamely tried to get his conservative
colleagues to stick to the Mississippi law’s original (unconstitutional)
15-week ban rather than considering a full overturn of Roe that the state
started pushing for as soon as Justice Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed. It was
clear when Barrett inanely skirted the issue of forced pregnancy and childbirth
by reassuring the court that “safe haven” laws still allowed women to give
their babies up for adoption. It was especially clear when Justice Brett
Kavanaugh began suggesting that the Constitution is “neutral on the question of
abortion” and enumerating cases in which precedent has been overturned. Based
on their line of questioning — and to the extent that it is predictive — a
majority of justices demonstrated not only a willingness to overturn Roe but
some prior consideration of how to justify doing so. Whether Dobbs is the case
that will finally mark the end of the constitutionally protected right to an
abortion (and we probably won’t know until June or July), it is clear that the
end is coming soon.

Continued: https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/political-commentary/roevwade-dobbsvjackson-abortion-lgbtq-rights-1266062/


Gutting Roe means 2022 will be about abortion rights

With the conservative-majority Supreme Court expected to roll back abortion rights next year, the danger in handing even more power to Republicans should be front and center in the midterms.

BY ERIC LUTZ, Vanity Fair
DECEMBER 2, 2021

Surprised that the Supreme Court, stacked 6-3 in favor of the conservatives, appears likely to gut or kill Roe v. Wade? Don’t be. This is what the right has been working toward for decades. It’s what Donald Trump promised on the campaign trail in the 2016 election and Hillary Clinton warned about. And it’s why Republicans rejoiced at the installation of Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett. None of this is sudden. None of this is accidental. It is the product of a systematic conservative campaign to make over the judicial system. It is the product of Republicans, openly hostile to abortion rights, being elected to positions of power.

Continued: https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2021/12/gutting-roe-means-2022-will-be-all-about-abortion-rights


Women share how access to abortion impacted their lives — whether they chose one or not

By Madeline Holcombe, CNN
Thu December 2, 2021

When Sam Blakely found out she was pregnant, she balled up her shower curtain and put it in her mouth so she could scream as loud as she needed to without her roommates hearing.

After a night out, a coworker had brought her to her home and raped her, an experience that came to haunt her when they would run into one another in the casino where they worked.

Continued: https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/02/health/abortion-supreme-court-experiences-wellness/index.html


The World Is Lifting Abortion Restrictions. Why Is the U.S. Moving Against the Tide?

Dec. 2, 2021
By Mary Fitzgerald

Ms. Fitzgerald is the director of expression at the Open Society Foundations and former editor in chief of the global news site openDemocracy.

The decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the case currently before the Supreme Court which focuses on the question of Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban, is unlikely to hinge on global data or the finer points of international law. And yet a growing cadre of briefing papers, political accords and court filings are co-opting the language of international human rights groups to argue against the basic rights and freedoms that most Americans have enjoyed for decades.

These arguments are worth addressing. They tell us worrisome things both about the health of American democracy and about what could happen if the court reverses Roe v. Wade next year.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/02/opinion/abortion-restrictions-roe-wade-usa.html


How Mississippi ended up with one abortion clinic and why it matters

The story of abortion access in the state helps explain why some legal experts believe the U.S. may be on the brink of overturning Roe v. Wade

By Caroline Kitchener and Casey Parks
Nov 30, 2021

When the abortion doctor lost his medical license in 2004, Nancy Atkins wasn’t sure how she could keep going. Malachy DeHenre had been the only doctor at the clinic Atkins owned in Jackson, Miss. Recruiting OB/GYNs to perform abortions anywhere was difficult, but in Mississippi, Atkins had learned, it was nearly impossible. The state had the toughest regulations and the most ardent antiabortion protesters. One activist even regularly told people that killing an abortion provider might count as “justifiable homicide.”

Seventeen years later, Atkins isn’t surprised that her state is the one that some legal observers believe is poised to overturn or seriously undermine Roe v. Wade. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, a challenge to Mississippi’s law banning most abortions after 15 weeks. Roe protects a person’s constitutional right to abortion before viability, usually around 22 to 24 weeks.


‘Her Heart Was Beating Too’: The Women Who Died After Abortion Bans

Nov. 29, 2021
By Sarah Wildman

In 2012, Savita Halappanavar, a 31-year-old married dentist, appeared at Ireland’s University Hospital Galway in pain. She was 17 weeks pregnant and miscarrying. According to Dr. Halappanavar’s husband, hospital staff said that there was no saving the pregnancy, but they refused to intercede because her fetus still had a heartbeat. She was told her only option was to wait.

Dr. Halappanavar became feverish. By the time the fetal heartbeat faded away, she was in organ failure. Two and a half days later, she was dead.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/29/opinion/heartbeat-abortion-bans-savita-izabela.html