USA – The coming state-federal showdown over abortion

by Mary Ziegler and Elizabeth Sepper
Fri August 5, 2022

A woman turned away with an ectopic pregnancy. A miscarrying mother sent home, where she develops an infection. People with severe pregnancy complications left untreated. Within a month of the Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade, abortion bans have thrown emergency care into disarray and put doctors in an impossible bind.

Federal law requires physicians to treat pregnant patients in emergencies, providing abortions when necessary, while the law in some states prohibits emergency abortions. A showdown between the federal government and the states is now brewing. The state of Texas is suing the Biden administration to block federal guidance that protects access to emergency abortion care, even in states where abortion is a crime. And on Tuesday, the administration went on the offensive, suing Idaho over its abortion restrictions.

Continued: https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/05/opinions/state-federal-showdown-abortion-ziegler-sepper/index.html


Choosing sterilization, delaying treatment: Medical choices in U.S. are changing amid new abortion laws

Doctors, patients making care decisions on premise abortions illegal in wake of Supreme Court decision

The Associated Press
Jul 16, 2022

A sexual assault survivor chooses sterilization so she won't be forced to give birth if she's is ever attacked again.

An obstetrician delays inducing a miscarriage until a woman with severe pregnancy complications seems "sick enough."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/us-abortion-laws-repercussions-1.6522965


‘At death’s door’: abortion bans endanger lives of high-risk patients, Texas study shows

In a preview of what’s to come in half the country, a near-total ban has led some providers to deny care until mothers’ health deteriorated

Mary Tuma
Wed 13 Jul 2022

Facing a rupture of membranes before fetal viability – a condition in which water breaks too early – a pregnant patient in Texas desperately needed an abortion. She risked infection, sepsis, excessive bleeding and even death.

But her healthcare provider’s hands were tied by Senate Bill 8, a near-total ban in effect since September 2021, preventing her from accessing that potentially life-saving care in her home state. Despite the risk associated with air travel, she boarded a plane to obtain the procedure out of state. Her obstetrician cautioned that she could go into labor in-flight and give birth to a stillborn 19-week fetus. “If you labor on the plane, leave the placenta inside of you,” the doctor warned.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jul/13/texas-abortion-ban-maternal-health-risk


Where will abortion still be legal after Roe v. Wade is overruled?

The Supreme Court is probably going to overrule Roe v. Wade this June. Here’s what happens next.

By Ian Millhiser 
Updated Apr 12, 2022

On Tuesday, Oklahoma’s Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt signed legislation banning nearly all abortions in that state — the only exception is for abortions necessary “to save the life of a pregnant woman in a medical emergency.”

The odd thing about this new law is that Oklahoma already has a law on its books banning all abortions, except when “necessary” to preserve the life of the pregnant person undergoing the abortion. The old law has a maximum penalty of 5 years in prison, while the new law increases the maximum penalty to 10 years plus a $100,000 fine.

Continued:  https://www.vox.com/23013308/supreme-court-roe-wade-abortion-legal-oklahoma-dobbs-jackson-womens-health


Doctors’ worst fears about the Texas abortion law are coming true

Updated March 1, 2022
Sarah McCammon and Lauren Hodges

In the days after the new Texas abortion law known as SB 8 took effect last September, Anna was planning her wedding to her fiancé, Scott. They'd set a date for this coming May — until Anna realized her period was almost two weeks late.

"I just remember laughing to myself because I was like, wow, for as responsible as I think I am all the time, I had no idea that I was pregnant — and that late," says Anna. NPR is using only her first name because of the sensitivity of her story.

Continued: https://www.npr.org/2022/02/28/1083536401/texas-abortion-law-6-months