El Salvador lawmakers overwhelmingly reject challenge to country’s complete abortion ban

OCTOBER 21, 2021
AFP

San Salvador — El Salvador's Congress voted on Wednesday to uphold the country's complete abortion ban, ruling against terminations even in exceptional circumstances. Salvadoran law prohibits the procedure in all cases — punishable by up to eight years in prison.

Prosecutors and judges classify some cases of abortion, even involuntary ones, as "aggravated homicide," punishable by up to 50 years in prison.

Continued : https://www.cbsnews.com/news/el-salvador-abortion-ban-upheld-by-congress/


El Salvador congress upholds total abortion ban

By The Associated Press
Wed., Oct. 20, 2021

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) — El Salvador’s congress voted yet again Wednesday to uphold the country’s total ban on abortions.

Women’s rights groups had petitioned congress to approve at least exceptions in the case of rape, risk to a woman’s health or life-threatening deformities. But the body voted 73 to 11 to maintain the current law.

Continued: https://www.thespec.com/ts/news/world/americas/2021/10/20/el-salvador-congress-upholds-total-abortion-ban.html


For These Abortion Clinic Escorts, The Vitriol From Protesters Has Gotten Way Worse As States Try To Restrict Access

“You never know who’s going to show up when you call 911. Nothing has ever come of it.”

Nicole Fallert, BuzzFeed News Reporter
Posted on October 16, 2021

Christine is used to being called a witch. As a volunteer escort at EMW Women’s Surgical Center in Louisville, Kentucky, she’s accustomed to crowds of anti-abortion protesters shouting the word at her while she accompanies patients into the clinic. “Devil” and “Nazi guard” are also frequently used.

Christine, who has been an escort for eight years, said patients are never prepared for the harassment that awaits them as they attempt to enter the building.

Continued: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/nicolefallert/abortion-clinic-escorts-protesters-concern


Texas created a blueprint for abortion restrictions. Republican-controlled states may follow suit.

How other states may follow Texas’s restrictive abortion law

By Meryl Kornfield, Caroline Anders and Audra Heinrichs - Washington
Post
September 3, 2021

Republican officials in more than a half-dozen states across the country moved
this week to replicate Texas’s restrictive abortion ban after the Supreme Court
declined to step in and stop the law from taking effect.

GOP officials in at least seven states, including Arkansas, Florida, South
Carolina and South Dakota, have suggested they may review or amend their
states’ laws to mirror Texas’s legislation, which effectively bans abortions
after six weeks. Kentucky, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Ohio and more are expected to
follow, after a year abortion activists have deemed “the worst legislative year
ever for U.S. abortion rights.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/09/03/texas-abortion-ban-states/


Conservatives are hell-bent on reasserting control over women’s bodies—and a fresh hell starts today with what women in the Lone Star State are waking up to.

Molly Jong-Fast, Contributing Editor
Updated Sep. 01, 2021

The Supreme Court declined to act and let Texas’ insane new abortion law stand, for now, in what looks to be the day Roe v. Wade began to die.

As of today, SB8, which Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law, bans abortions at six weeks, with no exception for rape or incest, while targeting anyone who “aids or abets” another person’s abortion. The idea is to make anyone who helps a woman get an abortion a legal target, even her Uber driver, with any citizen able to collect a bounty on abortion providers.

Continued: https://www.thedailybeast.com/this-law-begins-the-end-of-abortion-as-weve-known-it


With ban in effect, Texas abortion clinics will no longer terminate pregnancies after 6 weeks

By Caroline Kitchener, Emily Wax-Thibodeaux, Robert Barnes and Ann E. Marimow
Sep 1, 2021

AUSTIN — A Texas law that bans most abortions after six weeks of pregnancy went into effect Wednesday, as a midnight deadline for the Supreme Court to stop it came and went without action.

The court could still grant a request from abortion providers to halt the law, one of the nation’s most restrictive. But for now, abortion providers in Texas, including Planned Parenthood and Whole Woman’s Health, said they will no longer terminate pregnancies more than six weeks from a woman’s last period.

Continued: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/courts_law/texas-six-week-abortion-ban/2021/09/01/e53cf372-0a6b-11ec-a6dd-296ba7fb2dce_story.html


Supreme Court Asked to Block Texas Law Banning Most Abortions

The law, set to go into effect on Wednesday, bans abortions after about six weeks and deputizes citizens to file suits to enforce it.

By Adam Liptak
Published Aug. 30, 2021

WASHINGTON — Abortion providers in Texas asked the Supreme Court on Monday to block a state law banning abortions in the state as early as six weeks into pregnancy. The law, one of the most restrictive in the nation, is poised to go into effect on Wednesday.

If the Supreme Court does not intervene, lawyers for the providers said, access to abortion in Texas could largely end.  

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/30/us/supreme-court-texas-abortion.html


Texas poised to ban most abortions as court denies emergency motion

Law letting individuals sue those helping women access service will go into effect on 1 September unless federal court intervenes

Jessica Glenza
Mon 30 Aug 2021

Texas could become the first state in decades to ban most abortions, if a federal court allows a law called SB8 to take effect on 1 September.

A hearing was originally scheduled on Monday on whether the court should block the law. But the fifth circuit court of appeals cancelled the hearing late on Friday, and denied reproductive rights group an emergency motion on Sunday.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/aug/30/abortion-law-federal-court-decision-texas


USA – Why the Hyde Amendment and other barriers to reproductive care lead to more domestic violence

Hyde binds the seemingly separable issues of pregnancy, domestic abuse, poverty, and the global pandemic

By KYLIE CHEUNG
PUBLISHED AUGUST 28, 2021

Earlier this month, the House of Representatives passed a historic budget that didn't include the Hyde Amendment, a budget rider that's severely restricted coverage of abortion care by withholding federal funding since 1976. Of course, the gift of hindsight shows us celebrations of this monumental moment proved slightly premature, when it was quietly undone with a single stroke on Aug. 10.

By a narrow margin, determined as ever to deny us good things, the US Senate adopted an amendment to restore Hyde to the budget, and usher in yet another year of abortion care being all but banned for those who are struggling financially. Today, despite the relative quietness and feelings of helplessness attached to this loss for reproductive justice, we're closer than ever to eliminating Hyde, and there's too much at stake — especially for many victims of domestic abuse — to give up now.

Continued: https://www.salon.com/2021/08/28/why-the-hyde-amendment-and-other-barriers-to-reproductive-care-lead-to-more-domestic-violence/


Nadia: “There is Hope for a Better Future for Women in Poland.”

June 25, 2021

Nadia believes activism can change the world. Over the last few years in Poland, women’s reproductive choices have been stripped back at an alarming rate. The young activist wants to reverse this erosion of women’s rights by campaigning for better reproductive, labour and social rights across the country. Nadia is painfully aware that in Poland, where public discourse is dominated by men, the belief that “children and young women have no voice” still reigns.

"I wish we no longer had to talk about the wage gap, reproductive rights, the overloading of women with unpaid reproductive work. I want to live in a world where women had freedom of expression and the full right to pleasure on our terms," the activist says.

Continued: https://defendthedefenders.eu/nadia-there-is-hope-for-a-better-future-for-women-in-poland/