The Anti–Birth Control Movement Is the New Anti-Abortion Movement

BY MOLLY JONG-FAST
July 1, 2021

Republicans have started to blur the lines between birth control and abortion in the hopes of making it harder for American women to get both birth control and abortions. And nowhere is this clearer than in the Missouri statehouse, where lawmakers debated whether they needed to restrict Medicaid coverage of birth control and limit payments to Planned Parenthood. Yes, as the Kansas City Star reported, lawmakers there spent hours last week in a discussion that “resembled a remedial sex-education course.” It was a tricky play, attacking birth control as a way to attack abortion, and it didn’t work…this time.

“What’s been happening in Missouri last week should serve as a warning sign for what’s to come,” says Alexis McGill Johnson, president of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund. “We’re already hearing members of the U.S. Congress spread the same falsehoods we’ve seen in Missouri, conflating medications that prevent pregnancy—birth control and emergency contraception—with medications that end pregnancy.”

Continued: https://www.vogue.com/article/anti-birth-control-movement


Japan – Calls for Support During Unintended Pregnancies

June 8, 2021
Video: 3:36 minutes

Unintended pregnancies often force women to
make hard choices under pressure. Every year, in extreme cases, they even
result in the deaths of unplanned children. Shirai Chiaki, a professor at
Shizuoka University, says it's time for Japanese society to build a new
consensus that supports women through potentially life-changing decisions.

Continued: https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/videos/20210608133815578/


How lawmakers made it nearly impossible to legalize abortion in Honduras

By Tatiana Arias, CNN
Sun January 31, 2021

(CNN)This week, lawmakers in Honduras changed the country's constitution to make it virtually impossible to legalize abortion in the future -- an extreme election-year move that critics warn will further endanger women's health.

On Thursday, the country's Congress ratified a January 21 amendment to constitutional Article 67, which now specifically prohibits any "interruption of life" to a fetus, "whose life must be respected from the moment of conception."

Continued: https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/31/americas/honduras-abortion-ban-ratified-intl/index.html


Why Some Women Might Want ‘Missed-Period Pills’

Abortion drugs administered as early as 28 days after a woman’s last period can offer comfort in uncertainty to those who want it.

By Patrick Adams
Dec. 3, 2020

The pregnancy test is one of the most ubiquitous home health care products in America. What resembled a child’s chemistry set when it first arrived on the market in 1977 is now the widely available wand. Today, dozens of different devices promise to promptly deliver what any possibly-pregnant person is assumed to want: knowledge of her status.

Now a new study suggests that for all of the ease and convenience of the at-home test, a significant number of women would prefer not to know. Given the choice, they would opt instead to take two drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration to terminate a pregnancy. The first drug, mifepristone, blocks the effects of progesterone, a hormone without which the lining of the uterus begins to break down, while the second drug, misoprostol, induces contractions of the uterus that expel its contents.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/03/opinion/pregnancy-missed-period-pills.html


Easy access to ‘morning-after’ pill vital for women’s rights

November 7, 2020

The government is weighing plans to allow over-the-counter access to emergency contraceptive pills without a doctor’s prescription.

The proposal, which is expected to be part of the government's fifth basic plan to promote gender equality set to start next fiscal year, would help prevent unwanted pregnancies and protect the rights of women.

Continued:   http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/13909166


5 days later pill also to minors without prescription

For the Medicines Agency it is a "turning point for the physical and psychological health protection of adolescents"

October 11, 2020

It will no longer be necessary to have a medical prescription to dispense ulipistral acetate (EllaOne), the drug used for emergency contraception up to five days after intercourse, even to minors.

This was established by the Italian Medicines Agency Aifa with Resolution no. 998 of last 8 October.

Continued: https://www.unionesarda.it/en/articolo/news/italia/2020/10/10/pillola-dei-5-giorni-dopo-anche-alle-minorenni-senza-ricetta-137-1069260.html


India – Survey shows acute shortage of medical abortion pills in many states

The non-stocking of medical abortion drugs seems to be linked to overregulation by drug control authorities, said authorities.

Published: 10th August 2020
By Sumi Sukanya Dutta, Express News Service

NEW DELHI: A survey to assess the availability of the medical abortion pills in six states has shown its acute shortage in most of the states, triggering concerns of a sharp rise in unwanted pregnancies in the coming months.

The study by the Foundation for Reproductive Health Services India (FRSHI) involving 1500 chemists found that there was an overwhelming shortage of the drugs in five out of the six states surveyed with abysmal stocking in Madhya Pradesh (6.5%), Punjab (1.0%), Tamil Nadu (2.0%), Haryana (2.0%), and Delhi (34.0%).

Continued: https://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/2020/aug/10/survey-shows-acute-shortage-of-medical-abortion-pills-in-many-states-2181582.html


Access to emergency contraceptive pills is a woman’s right, not a luxury

Pharmacies price the pill at Rwf 10,000, Rwf 15,000, or even Rwf 25,000 instead of Rwf 4,200
By Dr Aflodis Kagaba
Published : June 29, 2020

During an unexpected and often dangerous situation, a person is required to take immediate action, the same applies to the prevention of an unwanted pregnancy.

The ever-increasing access to birth control for Rwandan women is a sign of progress in supporting them to take more control of their bodies.

Continued: https://www.newtimes.co.rw/opinions/access-emergency-contraceptive-pills-womans-right-not-luxury


Zimbabwe – Timely Pitch: Women Still Need Contraceptives During Lockdown

Timely Pitch: Women Still Need Contraceptives During Lockdown

by Edinah Masiyiwa
28.4.2020

Recently, my work phone rang and on the other end was a woman called Tendai (not her real name). Tendai needed to get a replenishment of her contraceptives. She tried to go to the women’s clinic that morning.

Our clinics were deemed essential and are open, but Tendai could not reach one as there was no public transport running in her area. Quickly, I assured Tendai that I would call her back with a solution. Fortunately, Women’s Action Group, the organisation I work for, is part of a coalition working on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and I was able to connect her to a service provider who helped her obtain her contraceptives as they could offer transport within a given radius and she lived close enough to receive that help.

Continued: https://www.thezimbabwean.co/2020/04/timely-pitch-women-still-need-contraceptives-during-lockdown/


Rwanda – Let’s stop restrictions on contraceptives for teenagers

Let’s stop restrictions on contraceptives for teenagers

By Andre Ndayambaje
Published : March 12, 2020

Mercy Mbabazi died at the age of 14 from severe infection due to unsafe abortion. Although she attempted to use emergency contraceptives to avoid that pregnancy, Mercy was not given the morning after pills because Rwandan laws say that teenagers need permission from their parents or must be accompanied by their guardians to access reproductive health services.

Mercy is just one case in an epidemic of teenage pregnancies sweeping Rwanda. Recent data shows that teenage pregnancies in the country have increased by 200 per cent in the last ten years. In the last four years, 78,000 teenage births were reported in Rwanda.

Continued: https://www.newtimes.co.rw/opinions/lets-stop-restrictions-contraceptives-teenagers