USA – Doctors say men are getting more vasectomies amid abortion restrictions nationwide

Jayla Whitfield-Anderson
Thu, January 12, 2023

After the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark case that protected abortion rights, medical professionals say they have seen a drastic increase in vasectomies.

Vasectomies offer a form of permanent birth control for men, and roughly 500,000 are performed every year in the United States.

“There was an increase of basically 100% in the number of vasectomies from the moment Roe v. Wade was overturned,” Dr. Esgar Guarin, the co-founder of SimpleVas Medical Clinic, told Yahoo News.

Continued: https://ca.news.yahoo.com/doctors-say-men-are-getting-more-vasectomies-amid-abortion-restrictions-nationwide-184026694.html


Maryland – Inside the Race to Open an All-Trimester Abortion Clinic

When Roe v. Wade fell, restrictions and bans created an access bottleneck for people seeking abortions, fueling a rising need for later-pregnancy terminations. Here, Cosmo goes behind the scenes of one clinic’s fight to open its doors.

by T.S. MENDOLA
NOV 14, 2022

At any other kind of clinic, the man in the baseball cap wouldn’t warrant attention. He’s just leaning against his bike, smoking a cigarette in the courtyard. But to Morgan Nuzzo, his presence is ominous. It’s 94 degrees this Tuesday afternoon in College Park, Maryland, and the man wears all black. Minutes tick by. He doesn’t make a move toward any of the businesses in the building.

Continued: https://www.cosmopolitan.com/lifestyle/a41558326/partners-in-abortion-care-clinic-all-trimesters/


What to know about the costs of traveling for abortion care in the US

Here’s what I learned from talking to hundreds of women who’ve sought abortions

August 30, 2022
Katrina Kimport

Abortion travel isn’t new. People have been crossing national and state borders to get abortion care since the 1960s, when air travel became more common and affordable.

The number of people who need to travel and the distances they must travel for care will increase following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which overturned Roe v. Wade.

Continued: https://theconversation.com/what-to-know-about-the-costs-of-traveling-for-abortion-care-in-the-us-heres-what-i-learned-from-talking-to-hundreds-of-women-whove-sought-abortions-187266


What This Later-Abortion Story Tells Us About a Post-Roe Future

The number of people seeking later abortions is undoubtedly about to increase, and our medical system is unprepared to care for them.

By Garnet Henderson, The Nation
May 28, 2022

In October of 2021, Kristyn Smith checked herself out of the hospital in Charleston, W.Va., where she had been denied an abortion. Bleeding and in pain, Smith drove for six hours with her fiancé to Washington, D.C., to have the procedure performed there. On the day of her first appointment at the Dupont Clinic, she was 27 weeks pregnant. “They were the sweetest, most compassionate people that I had ever met,” she said of the clinic staff, who made her feel safe and supported. The seven weeks leading up to her arrival there, however, had been a “nightmare.”

Continued: https://www.thenation.com/article/society/later-abortion-post-roe/


USA – What “crisis pregnancy centers” really do

What “crisis pregnancy centers” really do
Low-income people are going to the centers for basic services. They don’t always get what they need.

By Anna North
Mar 2, 2020

When Aya got a positive pregnancy test, she wanted to confirm the results at a clinic.

But the first six places she called either required her to pay out of pocket, or had no appointments for a week. So Aya went to a pregnancy resource center.

Continued: https://www.vox.com/2020/3/2/21146011/crisis-pregnancy-center-resource-abortion-title-x


USA – Crisis pregnancy centers’ endanger adolescent health, doctors say

Crisis pregnancy centers' endanger adolescent health, doctors say

Carolyn Crist
November 7, 2019

(Reuters Health) – “Crisis pregnancy centers” look and act like healthcare clinics but fail to meet medical and ethical standards, often using biased and inaccurate information to persuade women not to pursue an abortion, say two national doctors’ groups.

The “misinformation” these centers offer typically includes limited options for the next steps of pregnancy and unscientific sexual and reproductive health explanations, according to a joint statement by the Society for Adolescent Health and the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology that was published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Continued: https://nationalpost.com/pmn/entertainment-pmn/crisis-pregnancy-centers-endanger-adolescent-health-doctors-say


Hollywood rarely tells the truth about abortion. ‘Little Woods’ is different.

Hollywood rarely tells the truth about abortion. ‘Little Woods’ is different.

By Renee Bracey Sherman
April 23, 2019

Pop culture has made some progress since 1956, when an addition to the Motion Picture Production Code that governed Hollywood movie-making declared, “The subject of abortion shall be discouraged, shall never be more than suggested, and, when referred to, shall be condemned.” But even by contemporary standards, in which characters are allowed to have abortions and movies can depict those decisions positively, Nia DaCosta’s debut feature film, “Little Woods,” is a politically urgent revelation.

Rather than making the decision to have an abortion the major source of tension in the film, DaCosta starkly depicts the sacrifices that families make to afford health care, dramatizing the recent onslaught of restrictions on abortion. And her character’s choices place abortion in conversation with our national debate about opioid addiction and drug trafficking to illuminate these well-worn subjects in new ways.

Continued: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/04/23/hollywood-rarely-tells-truth-about-abortion-little-woods-is-different/


How Abortion Law in New York Will Change, and How It Won’t

How Abortion Law in New York Will Change, and How It Won’t
The Reproductive Health Act will remove barriers for women seeking to get abortions in New York. But some wish it could have gone further.

By Jia Tolentino
January 19, 2019

In the late spring of 2016, Erika Christensen was thirty-one weeks pregnant, and found out that the baby she was carrying would be unable to survive outside the womb. Her doctor told her that he was “incompatible with life.” Christensen and her husband wanted a child desperately—they called him Spartacus, because of how hard he seemed to be fighting—but she decided, immediately, to terminate the pregnancy: if the child was born, he would suffer, and would not live long; she wanted to minimize his suffering to whatever extent she could.

Christensen lived in New York, a state where, since 2014, an estimated twenty-five to twenty-seven per cent of pregnancies end in abortion.

Continued: https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/how-abortion-law-in-new-york-will-change-and-how-it-wont