What The Green Scarf Means In The Fight For Reproductive Rights

FRANCES SOLÁ-SANTIAGO
MAY 17, 2022

When a leaked Supreme Court draft opinion in early May revealed that Rove v. Wade will likely be overturned, protests broke out across the country, as activists pushed for lawmakers to codify the landmark decision that protected a pregnant person’s right to choose abortion via the Women’s Health Protection Act. Over the weekend, the New York chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America held a march and called on all the attendees to wear green and “bring your green bandana.” Similar protests were held in cities like Miami and Washington, D.C., where many attendees likewise sported green scarves on their wrists and necks.

While the green scarf may be the new symbol of the pro-abortion fight in the U.S, it's been around for at least a decade. In fact, it emerged in Argentina in the late 2010s, as the country’s activists fought to decriminalize abortion in a sweeping movement that earned them the title “Marea Verde” or “Green Wave.”

Continued: https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/2022/05/10978997/green-scarf-meaning-roe-v-wade-protests


Women’s Rights Are Human Rights

This fight against women's oppression is not just a struggle for women, but for all of humanity.

Tuesday, April 06, 2021

by Alison Bodine, Common Dreams

March 8, 2021, International Women’s Day, is an important day to recognize the
challenges confronted and the great victories made by women around the world,
especially in the past year of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Over the last 12 months, in addition to the health challenges posed by Covid-19
itself, women have faced increasing rates of domestic violence, higher rates of
job loss, as well as a larger burden of the care of children and families
because of the pandemic. In countries like the U.S. and Canada, government
mismanagement of Covid-19 has amplified the health and economic crisis. Black,
Indigenous, and immigrant women and their communities have been
disproportionately impacted by the crisis.
Continued: https://www.commondreams.org/views/2021/04/06/womens-rights-are-human-rights


Argentina’s implementation of abortion law still murky

Legalization of early-term abortion celebrated by pro-choice activists and decried by pro-life activists

Bala Chambers
02.02.2021

On Dec. 30 last year, Argentina's Congress voted to legalize elective abortion in the first 14 weeks of gestation as the Senate backed the bill two years after rejecting a similar one.

Pro-choice activists welcomed the decision while pro-life sectors decried it.

Continued: https://www.aa.com.tr/en/americas/argentina-s-implementation-of-abortion-law-still-murky/2131149


Argentina legalized abortion. Here’s how it happened and what it means for Latin America.

Abortion rights advocates focused on public health consequences of prohibition and disproportionate impact on women in poverty

By Taylor Boas, Mariela Daby, Mason Moseley and Amy Erica Smith
Jan. 18, 2021

Early on Dec. 30, Argentina became only the second democratic country in Latin America to legalize abortion. The Senate’s 38-to-29 vote on a bill passed by the legislature’s lower house was celebrated by masses of green-clad activists in the streets of Buenos Aires. In recent years, these activists have been mobilizing in larger and larger numbers for reproductive rights.

Abortion legalization failed in 2018. What changed?
In 2018, a similar bill was passed by Argentina’s Chamber of Deputies but came up short in the Senate. By 2020, advocates for legalization had President Alberto Fernández on their side; Fernández had defeated antiabortion incumbent President Mauricio Macri in 2019.

Continued: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2021/01/18/argentina-legalized-abortion-heres-how-it-happened-what-it-means-latin-america/


Argentina Legalized Abortion Until 14 Weeks—and We Have Feminist Organizers to Thank

The recent victory in Argentina demonstrates that women’s rights are never simply granted; they must be fought for.

1/11/2021
by CORA FERNÁNDEZ ANDERSON

In the early morning hours of Dec. 30—fifteen years after the launch of the Campaign for Safe, Free and Legal Abortion—the Argentine Congress passed a bill to legalize abortion until 14 weeks, a historic move in a region with some of the world’s most restrictive abortion laws.

After a long session that went overnight, closely followed by large crowds outside of the Congressional building, the Senate voted 38-29 to legalize abortion. The streets became a feast of green, tears and joy, hugs and chants overwhelmed the scene.

Continued:  https://msmagazine.com/2021/01/11/argentina-legalized-abortion-until-14-weeks-the-national-campaign-for-safe-free-and-legal-abortion-is-the-hero-behind-it/


Feminist ‘green tide’ delivers legal abortion in Argentina

Argentina’s “marea verde” has helped deliver sweeping abortion reform in one of Latin America’s most Catholic countries.

Jan 2, 2021

As the result of the Senate vote on the government’s abortion bill was announced, the huge crowd of campaigners gathered outside Congress erupted into joy.

Among the cheers and tears, almost all the demonstrators were clad in green clothing – most notably the now-famous headscarf that’s been worn permanently by thousands of people across the country, demanding legal, safe and free abortion in Argentina.

Continued: https://batimes.com.ar/news/argentina/feminist-green-tide-delivers-legal-abortion-in-argentina.phtml


‘Down with patriarchy, long live feminism’: How demonstrations led to Argentina legalising abortion

What really kicked off the movement was the brutal murders of women in 2015, including a 14-year-old pregnant girl, and led to the creation of the Ni Una Menos (Not One Woman Less) movement, which began highlighting the struggle Argentine women faced in getting underground abortions.

Updated: Jan 02, 2021
hindustantimes.com | Edited by Nilavro Ghosh

Argentina has become the largest South American nation to legalise abortion after massive demonstrations across the country by pro-abortion activists, who had seen several bills about the issue rejected until now. December 30 saw one of the most important moments in Argentina’s history when after more than 12 hours of debate, the Catholic church influenced government passed the law, which legalises abortion allowing terminations up to 14 weeks of pregnancy.

“We managed to break the prejudice, and the discussion became a lot less dramatic. Society at large started to understand the debate in more moderate, less fanatic terms,” Lucila Crexell, a senator, was quoted by the New York Times.

Continued: https://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/down-with-patriarchy-long-live-feminism-how-demonstrations-led-to-argentina-legalising-abortion/story-KldI91DjS1SwbmiSdDCYBK.html


Argentina’s Decades-Long Fight to Legalize Abortion Ends in Victory

The campaign to legalize abortion began sometime in the late 1970s, when the “grandmothers” of the green wave were living in exile across Europe.

By Cecilia Nowell
Jan, 2021

On Tuesday evening, Argentina was filled with
green: green graffiti proclaiming “Children, Not Mothers,” green banners
exclaiming “It Will Be Law,” and green bandanas reading “National Campaign for
Legal, Safe, and Free Abortion.” Teenagers and grown women alike tied the green
handkerchiefs of the campaign to legalize abortion around their necks to signal
their devotion to the cause as they poured out into the streets of more than
120 cities. Together, they stood vigil for nearly 12 hours as the Argentine
Senate debated a bill to legalize abortion.

Just after 4 AM on Wednesday, as hundreds of thousands waited on the steps of
the Palace of the Argentine National Congress, the news came in: With 38 votes
in favor, 29 opposed, and 1 abstention, abortion was legalized. Crowds cheered
and sobbed with relief.

Continued: https://www.thenation.com/article/world/argentina-abortion-feminism/


Argentina Legalizes Abortion, a Milestone in a Conservative Region

The Senate vote on Wednesday was a major victory for Latin America’s growing feminist movement, and its ripple effects are likely to be widespread.

By Daniel Politi and Ernesto Londoño

Dec. 30, 2020

BUENOS AIRES — Argentina on Wednesday became the largest nation in Latin
America to legalize abortion, a landmark vote in a conservative region and a
victory for a grass-roots movement that turned years of rallies into political
power.

The high-stakes vote in the Senate gripped the nation into the early morning,
and the measure’s approval — by a wider-than-expected tally of 38 to 29, with
one abstention — came after 12 hours of often dramatic debate, exposing the
tensions between the long-dominant Roman Catholic Church, whose influence is
waning, and a growing feminist movement.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/30/world/americas/argentina-legalizes-abortion.html


High hopes for abortion rights to expand in Argentina

Anastasia Moloney, Thomson Reuters Foundation
Nov 18, 2020

BOGOTA, Nov 18 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – A fresh effort to make abortion legal in Argentina has a better chance of success than did previous failed efforts, supporters said on Wednesday, given political change and unprecedented backing by the president in the South American country.

Argentine center-left President Alberto Fernandez presented the bill to Congress this week to legalize abortion, saying reproductive rights are a public health issue.

Continued: https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/crime-pmn/high-hopes-for-abortion-rights-to-expand-in-argentina