What The Green Scarf Means In The Fight For Reproductive Rights

FRANCES SOLÁ-SANTIAGO
MAY 17, 2022

When a leaked Supreme Court draft opinion in early May revealed that Rove v. Wade will likely be overturned, protests broke out across the country, as activists pushed for lawmakers to codify the landmark decision that protected a pregnant person’s right to choose abortion via the Women’s Health Protection Act. Over the weekend, the New York chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America held a march and called on all the attendees to wear green and “bring your green bandana.” Similar protests were held in cities like Miami and Washington, D.C., where many attendees likewise sported green scarves on their wrists and necks.

While the green scarf may be the new symbol of the pro-abortion fight in the U.S, it's been around for at least a decade. In fact, it emerged in Argentina in the late 2010s, as the country’s activists fought to decriminalize abortion in a sweeping movement that earned them the title “Marea Verde” or “Green Wave.”

Continued: https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/2022/05/10978997/green-scarf-meaning-roe-v-wade-protests


Abortion as a Human Right: The Fight for Reproductive Rights in Argentina and Poland

07.FEB.2022
Jaya Nayar

On September 22, 2021, a 30-year-old Polish woman named Izabela died of septic shock at the hospital after her unborn baby’s heart stopped beating. Her death initiated waves of protests across Poland and was seen as the direct consequence of a near total ban on abortion passed in 2020, which outlawed the termination of pregnancies even in the case of fetal defects. Under this new law, unlawful abortion could lead to up to eight years in prison. Terrified of the law and of its potential consequences, Izabela’s doctors waited too long to terminate the pregnancy despite knowing the potential risks for the mother—resulting in her death.

The case of Poland sheds light on a puzzling contemporary phenomenon. The right to abortion has recently been under attack in several countries where it was previously legalized in the late 20th century. In September 2021, the US Supreme Court refused to block legislation in Texas that would ban terminations of pregnancy after six weeks, which is after many women are even aware that they are pregnant. In Turkey, where abortion has been legal since 1983, President Erdogan’s conservative position on abortion is making it increasingly difficult for women to access abortions in public hospitals.

Continued: https://hir.harvard.edu/abortion-as-a-human-right-the-fight-for-reproductive-rights-in-argentina-and-poland/


How Argentina broke the mould on abortion

Years of campaigning for women’s rights and against domestic violence have paid off and other countries in the region could now follow suit, Lucinda Elliott writes

Lucinda Elliott
Wednesday January 06 2021

Graça, a 24-year-old Brazilian medical student, is booked on a flight to Argentina this week to have an abortion. Nearly ten weeks pregnant, she has secured a procedure in Buenos Aires, the Argentine capital, more than 1,800 miles away from Minas Gerais state university, where she is studying for a degree.

For Graça, neither supporting a baby nor having a legal termination is a viable option in Brazil, where the draconian abortion law dates back to 1940. She is on a scholarship and to make some money for the journey she has been baking and selling cupcakes.

Continued: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/how-argentina-broke-the-mould-on-abortion-wr70khksj


Argentina legalises abortion in landmark moment for women’s rights

Country becomes only the third in South America to permit elective abortions

Tom Phillips , Latin America correspondent, and Amy Booth and Uki Goñi in Buenos Aires
Wed 30 Dec 2020

Argentina has become the largest Latin American country to legalise abortion after its senate approved the historic law change by 38 votes in favour to 29 against, with one abstention.

Elated pro-choice campaigners who had been keeping vigil outside Buenos Aires’s neoclassical congressional palace erupted in celebration as the result was announced at just after 4am on Wednesday.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/dec/30/argentina-legalises-abortion-in-landmark-moment-for-womens-rights


Rape victim, 12, gives birth to twins in Argentina after she was denied an abortion

By Charlotte Mitchell
9 December 2020

A 12-year-old girl has given birth to twins in Argentina after being denied an abortion by local authorities despite having been raped.

Authorities in Jujuy forced the child to remain pregnant until the twins could be safely delivered by caesarean section.

Continued: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9033887/Rape-victim-12-gives-birth-twins-Argentina-denied-abortion.html


Argentina’s new president vows to legalise abortion

Argentina's new president vows to legalise abortion
Campaigners hail Alberto Fernández’s pledge to oversee U-turn in official policy

Uki Goñi in Buenos Aires
Sun 17 Nov 2019

Argentina’s president-elect, Alberto Fernández, has promised he will move to legalise abortion after taking office on 10 December.

He will send a bill to congress which, if approved, would make Argentina the first major Latin American nation with legalised abortion. The ruling in the 45 million-strong country would follow decisions by its much smaller neighbour Uruguay, which legalised the practice in 2012, and Cuba, in 1965.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/nov/17/argentina-new-president-vows-legalise-abortion


Argentine abortion activists unbowed in regional battle

Argentine abortion activists unbowed in regional battle

AFP
August 9, 2019

One year after Argentina’s Senate defeated a bill to legalize abortion, the country’s feminists are keeping up the fight and leading Latin America’s struggle for abortion rights.

Apart from Cuba, Uruguay and Mexico City, voluntary abortion is illegal in Latin America, although it does take place, clandestinely, in conditions that are usually deplorable.

Continued: https://egyptindependent.com/argentine-abortion-activists-unbowed-in-regional-battle/


Argentinians formally leave Catholic church over stance on abortion

Argentinians formally leave Catholic church over stance on abortion
More than 3,700 people submit apostasy requests in protest against anti-abortion campaign

Uki Goñi in Buenos Aires
Sun 9 Sep 2018

Thousands of Argentinians – most of them women – have started formal proceedings to abandon the Catholic church, in protest of the church’s campaign against efforts to legalise abortion in the country.

In the month since the country's senate voted to maintain a ban on almost all abortions, more than 3,700 people have submitted apostasy applications to the Argentinian synod, according to César Rosenstein, a lawyer and founding member of the Argentinian Coalition for a Lay State.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/09/argentina-catholic-church-legalize-abortion-apostacy


Latin America’s Rights Riddle

Latin America’s Rights Riddle
Why the region says yes to same-sex marriage and no to abortion.

By Omar G. Encarnación
August 27, 2018

In Latin America, progressive politics present something of a mystery: As LGBT rights have flourished, women’s reproductive rights have floundered. Earlier this month, for example, a bill to legalize abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy was defeated in the Argentine Senate. This is the same body that in 2010 made Argentina the first Latin American country to legalize same-sex marriage with identical rights to heterosexual marriage. And since that historic milestone, Argentina has enacted one of the most liberal laws on gender identity to be found anywhere in the world. Its code allows people to change the gender listed on their legal documents without a diagnosis of gender dysphoria or permission from a judge, as is required in most countries. The country has also granted same-sex couples reproductive rights, such as access to in vitro fertilization under the national health plan, and has banned programs that aim to “cure” same-sex attraction.

Continued: https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/08/27/latin-americas-rights-riddle/?wpmm=1&wpisrc=nl_todayworld


Despite law’s defeat, women fight on for abortion rights in Argentina

Despite law’s defeat, women fight on for abortion rights in Argentina

By Kathleen Durkin
posted on August 26, 2018

Women in Argentina may have lost a vote for the right to abortion on Aug. 9, but they are undaunted. They are not intimidated or afraid. They are angry. They are determined. They are optimistic. With renewed energy, they say they will keep on organizing until they win this fundamental right.

The current struggle is for legalization of elective abortions up to the 14th week of pregnancy; 62 percent of the population supports reform. The lower house of the Argentinian Congress had passed such a law on June 14, in response to the mass movement. However, the more conservative Senate narrowly defeated legalization on Aug. 9 with a 38-31 vote; two senators abstained. The majority of “no” votes were cast by men over the age of 50.

Continued: https://www.workers.org/2018/08/26/despite-laws-defeat-women-fight-on-for-abortion-rights-in-argentina/