South Carolina’s Supreme Court Says the State Constitution Protects a Right to Abortion

The court ruled that the state's six-week abortion ban violates the right to privacy.

JACOB SULLUM
1.6.2023

The South Carolina Supreme Court yesterday ruled that the right to privacy protected by the state's constitution includes a right to abortion. The court concluded that a 2021 law prohibiting abortion after fetal cardiac activity can be detected, which typically happens around the sixth week of pregnancy, violates that right.

"We hold that the decision to terminate a pregnancy rests upon the utmost personal and private considerations imaginable, and implicates a woman's right to privacy," Justice Kaye Hearn writes in the lead opinion. "While this right is not absolute, and must be balanced against the State's interest in protecting unborn life, this Act, which severely limits—and in many instances completely forecloses—abortion, is an unreasonable restriction upon a woman's right to privacy and is therefore unconstitutional."

Continued: https://reason.com/2023/01/06/south-carolinas-supreme-court-says-the-state-constitution-protects-a-right-to-abortion/


State abortion bans are preventing cancer patients from getting chemotherapy

Affidavits in Ohio show people had to leave the state for abortions before they could get cancer treatment. It’s an issue across the country.

Shefali Luthra
October 7, 2022

A six-week abortion ban in Ohio has forced people with cancer to travel out of state for abortions that are necessary to continue with life-saving treatment, according to affidavits submitted by abortion providers in the state. In at least two cases, cancer patients have been blocked from receiving treatment until their pregnancies were terminated — and getting an abortion required them to leave the state.

The cases underscore how abortion bans — even those with exceptions to save the life of the pregnant person — have upended patients’ lives and limited doctors’ abilities to provide essential medical treatments.

Continued: https://19thnews.org/2022/10/state-abortion-bans-prevent-cancer-patients-chemotherapy/


‘I would wish this on absolutely no one’: How three women dealt with pregnancy in the year since Texas’ six-week abortion ban

To mark the first anniversary of SB 8 going into effect, The 19th spoke with Texans who sought an abortion in this past year. Each has a different story. But all shared similar sentiments: anger, sorrow, frustration and fear.

Shefali Luthra, Health Reporter
August 29, 2022

Tiff found out she was pregnant on New Year’s Day. Her period was three days late, just enough to suspect that something was off. Still, when she saw the two pink lines, she was shocked.

She was 16. She didn’t know what to do or what would happen with her parents, whom she describes as conservative.

Continued: https://19thnews.org/2022/08/pregnancy-texas-six-week-abortion-ban/


USA – Fear and uncertainty grip patients as abortion referral services struggle to keep up

BY: SUSAN TEBBEN
 AUGUST 8, 2022

Abortion referral services have seen a change in how they do their work, but despite restrictions that make it less possible to get an abortion in Ohio, clinics and non-profits definitely haven’t seen a shortage of need.

Abortion Fund-Ohio, which provides case management, grants and resources for patients in need of abortion care, had to take an “intake pause” recently, not because they didn’t have things to do, but because of an onslaught of calls and requests following the overturning of Roe v. Wade by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Continued: https://ohiocapitaljournal.com/2022/08/08/fear-and-uncertainty-grip-patients-as-abortion-referral-services-struggle-to-keep-up/


How Republicans pass abortion bans most Americans don’t want

Legalized abortion in some form is widely supported, but gerrymandered districts allow politicians to push extreme measures through

Sam Levine in New York
Wed 8 Jun 2022

On 10 April 2019, the Ohio legislature easily passed SB 23, a bill that banned abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

It was a move that should have carried considerable political risk in Ohio, a state closely divided between Democrats and Republicans. There wasn’t widespread support for the bill – polling showed public opinion was nearly evenly split over the bill (a poll after the bill was passed showed a majority opposed it), John Kasich, a previous Republican governor, had twice vetoed the bill, saying it was unconstitutional, and it had stalled in the legislature for years.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jun/07/gerrymandering-abortion-roe-v-wade-ohio


Oklahoma’s New Abortion Ban Leaves Clinics Reeling

Near-total ban on abortions took immediate effect in the state, forcing abortion clinics to halt procedures

By Jennifer Calfas
May 27, 2022

Oklahoma abortion clinics suspended appointments and are now referring patients to nearby states after new legislation quickly outlawed most abortions there.

Gov. Kevin Stitt, a Republican, signed a ban on abortion at any stage of pregnancy into law Wednesday. It took effect immediately and is now the strictest antiabortion law in any U.S. state. The law also deputizes enforcement to private citizens, a strategy first used by Texas lawmakers that has made it more difficult for abortion-rights groups to challenge the regulations in court.

Continued: https://www.wsj.com/articles/oklahomas-new-abortion-ban-leaves-clinics-reeling-11653610467


USA – ‘Pushed to the margins’: Why some activists and lawmakers say abortion bans are a form of White supremacy

The threat to abortion access has underscored the economic hardships and maternal health crisis that Black and brown women face.

by Nicquel Terry Ellis, CNN
Wed May 18, 2022

The first time Kenya Martin got an abortion, she was a 19-year-old college student who felt she wasn't old enough or mature enough to raise a child.

The second time, Martin was a 26-year-old single mom making $12 an hour as a bank teller, could barely afford childcare or health insurance and was in a custody battle with her daughter's father. Martin would later have four more abortions, each time knowing she did not want another child.

Continued: https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/18/us/abortion-ban-women-of-color/index.html


She Couldn’t Get an Abortion in Texas. So She Went to Mexico.

Mexico is emerging as an unlikely savior for U.S. women desperate to terminate their unintended pregnancies.

By Emily Green
18.5.22

MONTERREY, Mexico — Fernanda had been on birth control for more than 10 years, so she went into denial when her period didn’t come. Finally, she rented a car and drove to the nearest abortion clinic two and a half hours away, in San Antonio. But then a nurse said the embryo had a heartbeat, and told Fernanda that she wasn’t allowed to get an abortion because her pregnancy was too far along.

“The staff was friendly, but they could not give me the pill,” said Fernanda, 29, a nursing student in Laredo, Texas. “They told me I was six weeks and five days pregnant. They told me to go to Oklahoma to get the abortion pill over there.” A 10-hour drive from Laredo, the trip was both too far and too expensive for her.

Continued: https://www.vice.com/en/article/7kbgwy/she-couldnt-get-an-abortion-in-texas-so-she-went-to-mexico


Tribal Land Is Suddenly at the Center of the Fight for Abortion Access

Oklahoma's governor is warning tribes about "setting up abortion clinics" on their sovereign land.

By Kylie Cheung
May 17, 2022

Across the country, Republican governors are champing at the bit to end abortion rights in their states once Roe v. Wade falls. And in Oklahoma, the state with the second highest population of Indigenous people, Gov. Kevin Stitt is taking this crusade a step further—threatening tribes that continue to offer abortion care on their sovereign land.

“Oklahomans will not think very well of that if tribes try to set up abortion clinics,” Stitt said in a Fox News interview on Sunday. “They think that you can be 1/1,000th tribal member and not have to follow the state law.”

Continued: https://jezebel.com/tribal-land-is-suddenly-at-the-center-of-the-fight-for-1848937428


Many states are bracing for a post-Roe world. In Oklahoma, it’s practically arrived.

Already, clinicians in Oklahoma are trying to devise strategies to help their patients get to clinics in other states because of a six-week ban. But there are limits to what they can do.

Shefali Luthra, Health Reporter
May 12, 2022

The day after the Supreme Court leak, Andrea Gallegos had already started to cancel patients’ appointments.

A draft opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that guaranteed access to abortion, had been published online and verified by the court. In the aftermath, Gallegos, the administrator for Tulsa Women’s Clinic, an Oklahoma-based abortion provider, wasn’t worried about Roe — at least, it wasn’t the first thing she was worried about. To her, there was a bigger, more immediate threat: a six-week abortion ban the Republican governor was expected to sign any day now. The law, a direct copycat of a prohibition currently in effect in Texas, was expected to survive legal challenges. It would take effect immediately.

Continued: https://19thnews.org/2022/05/oklahoma-abortion-clinics-access-limitations/