25 Years of Progress on Women’s Health Is in Danger

25 Years of Progress on Women’s Health Is in Danger
Because of course it is.

Words: Serra Sippel
Pictures: UN Women
Date: September 25th, 2019

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), and without missing a beat the Trump Administration has pounced on yet another opportunity to renege on US global commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights.

In the lead-up to the United Nations General Assembly high-level meeting on universal health coverage, which took place on September 23, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary Alex Azar of the US Department of Health and Human Services sent a joint letter to governments asking that they join the US in rejecting longstanding global commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality.

Continued: https://inkstickmedia.com/25-years-of-progress-on-womens-health-is-in-danger/


India – A human health project

A human health project
Empowering women to make reproductive choices and opt for quality family planning services can help India not only address the fertility challenge but fulfill the ICPD pledge

Friday, 12 July 2019
Swapna Majumdar

Ever since 1989, July 11 is observed as the World Population Day to draw attention to issues surrounding human population. The urgent need to provide an enabling environment to facilitate women’s autonomy in reproductive decisions was underlined five years later in 1994 at the Cairo International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). Here, for the first time, an international agreement, recognising the right to sexual and reproductive health, was signed by 179 countries, including India.

Twenty five years have passed since the historic ICPD Programme of Action. Although India has taken several measures to provide universal access to reproductive health services, including contraceptives, has it really delivered on its promise to give women the right to choose when, if and how many children to have?

Continued: https://www.dailypioneer.com/2019/columnists/a-human-health-project.html


RCOG response to latest abortion statistics in England and Wales

RCOG response to latest abortion statistics in England and Wales

News 13 June 2019

The Department of Health and Social Care published statistics today which show the number of abortions carried out in England and Wales is at its highest level.

There were 200,608 abortions in 2018, an increase of 4% on the previous year.

Overall, abortion rates have increased in the last decade for all women over the age of 25. Less than half (48%) of abortions were to women who had already had one or more previous births.

Continued: https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/news/rcog-response-to-latest-abortion-statistics-in-england-and-wales/


Tanzania – The unsolved puzzle on family planning choice

The unsolved puzzle on family planning choice

Saturday May 4 2019
By Salome Gregory

We tend to imagine our future families coming on the heels of a well-laid plan, but the reality is that plenty of us become parents entirely by accident.

In fact, in Tanzania, an estimated one million pregnancies are unintended.

continued: https://www.thecitizen.co.tz/magazine/The-unsolved-puzzle-on-family-planning-choice/1840564-5099808-w97qtvz/index.html


In Developing Regions, Greater Investment Is Needed to Help Adolescents Prevent Unintended Pregnancy

In Developing Regions, Greater Investment Is Needed to Help Adolescents Prevent Unintended Pregnancy

Nov 9, 2018

20 Million Adolescent Women Have an Unmet Need for Modern Contraception

Ensuring that adolescent women are able to choose whether and when to have children is crucial to their sexual and reproductive health, yet new data published today by the Guttmacher Institute show that contraceptive services in developing regions fall short of meeting adolescents’ needs. The new data, published in a series of fact sheets, indicate that as of 2017, an estimated 36 million young women aged 15–19 in developing regions are married or sexually active and want to avoid becoming pregnant in the next two years. Yet the majority of this group—20 million adolescents—are not using a modern contraceptive method and thus have an unmet need for modern contraception. Most adolescent women with unmet need are using no contraceptive method (85%), while the remaining 15% are using traditional methods, such as withdrawal or periodic abstinence, which are less effective than modern methods.

Continued: https://www.guttmacher.org/news-release/2018/developing-regions-greater-investment-needed-help-adolescents-prevent-unintended