Decoder: Why abortion is more than a political debate

Decoder: Why abortion is more than a political debate
Abortion is wrapped up in politics in many nations including the U.S. But one in four pregnancies ends in abortion, making it a global health issue.

July 3, 2019
By Maggie Fox

Abortion is one of the most common medical procedures globally.

It is grist for a raging political debate in the United States, nearly half a century after the highest court in the country ruled that women have the right to choose whether or not to end a pregnancy.

Continued: https://news-decoder.com/2019/07/03/decoder-abortion/

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USA – ‘I’m an OB/GYN – All Abortions Should Be Legal. No Exceptions.’

'I’m an OB/GYN - All Abortions Should Be Legal. No Exceptions.'
Does a woman need to be on her death bed for her to be given the right to abort her pregnancy?

By Jennifer Gunter, MD, OB/GYN, as told to Tiffany Ayuda
May 21, 2019

Like a huge tide, there's a wave of Republican-led states that are enacting anti-abortion laws, and it's hurting women in many ways that we don't realize. From Georgia and Ohio's abortion bans that end access at six weeks to Alabama's almost complete ban, women are being marginalized more than ever. As a physician and gynecologist who has performed abortions and pre-term deliveries, it's terrifying to see how lawmakers are passing bills left and right on what women and gender minorities can and can't do with their bodies. And while not all of these laws have taken effect yet, they pose a serious risk to reproductive rights and add fuel to the pro-life side's efforts to strike down Roe v. Wade, which legalizes abortions nationwide.

Continued: https://www.prevention.com/health/amp27526828/abortion-bans-jennifer-gunter-gynecologist/

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‘It’s not a little child’: gynecologists join the fight against six-week abortion bans

'It's not a little child': gynecologists join the fight against six-week abortion bans
Doctors argue that the bans, known as ‘fetal heartbeat’ bills, are medically inaccurate and use misleading language

Adrian Horton in New York
Wed 24 Apr

High-profile gynecologists are criticizing the framing of six-week abortion bans, known as “fetal heartbeat” bills, as medically inaccurate.

The bans, now moving through nearly a dozen state legislatures, propose the strictest limitations on the right to abortion as established by the US supreme court case Roe v Wade in 1973.

Continued: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/24/its-not-a-little-child-gynecologists-join-the-fight-against-six-week-abortion-bans

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Born Alive Abortion Survivors: Parsing Fact from Fiction

Born Alive Abortion Survivors: Parsing Fact from Fiction

March 11, 2019
by Libby Anne

Last week, a friend sent me an article bearing the headline They Are Real: Meet Born-Alive Abortion Survivors. Could I maybe blog about it, she asked? This article led me down to a rabbit hole with numbers that kept getting bigger. When I reached an article that argued that there are 44,000 abortion survivors living in the U.S. today, I knew we had a definitional problem. What is really going on here?

The article my friend sent me profiled five individuals it labeled “abortion survivors.” These individuals are real people. The first one profiled Gianna Jesson, whose mother had a saline abortion at 30 weeks in 1977, and Gianna survived. When she was born alive, she was provided with care and given up for adoption. Melissa Ohden’s biological mother had a saline abortion at 31 weeks in 1977; she, too, survived and was provided care.

Continued: https://www.patheos.com/blogs/lovejoyfeminism/2019/03/born-alive-abortion-survivors-parsing-fact-from-fiction.html

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USA/Canada – Why I Wanted to Learn to Perform Abortions

Why I Wanted to Learn to Perform Abortions
With the future of contraception in question, looking back to recent history is instructive.

By Jen Gunter
Oct. 14, 2018

It starts with steel.

A speculum. A needle. A tenaculum to steady the cervix. A set of dilators. These were the instruments I used when I trained to perform abortions in the 1990s.

There was also plastic and suction. The equipment was all so hard and sharp, and yet the procedure itself required a delicate touch. This was before ultrasound was commonly used, so a surgical abortion was often performed blindly. It took experience to recognize and understand the feel of steel and hard plastic on the cervix and the uterus. Not just because you couldn’t see, but also because the tissue changes week by week as the uterus enlarges and the muscle thins.

Continued: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/style/performing-abortions.html

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